anyone know of animation frame references?

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Post » Fri Dec 25, 2009 1:30 pm

The problem is, you're comparing traditional animation techniques to game animation. Which a lot of times isn't viable.

For every extra fraction of a second your firing animation is playing. It's another fraction of a second I, the player, have to wait before the bullet is fired. Now when you factor in player reaction time. You're risking very slow response time. Which annoys players. That's why you will often see sequences used for quick actions have less frames or simply happen very quickly. A player doesn't want to press the fire button, then wait for it to happen. Sure, that's more realistic, but it's not what a player will want. Especially if they just lost the game right at the end, because of it.

So yeah, while more frames will look smoother. And could be fine in other situations. For actions relying on fast reaction times. It's a nono. Come to that, same could be said for anything the player does. They move to the left, they want to go left right that moment. But no matter how good their reflexes are, there is going to be a pause between their brain saying do that, to their hand performing the action, to the game responding in kind. That can take a second or more in a lot of cases. So adding more time to that is going to make the controls feel sluggish, forcing the player to fight with them more than the bad guys on screen.

It's just something to bare in mind. Finding a happy medium between quality and response.
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Post » Fri Dec 25, 2009 1:42 pm

Concerning gameplay you're out of the conversation's bounds. We're not talking about gameplay. Trust me here, I know my gameplay design but this conversation has nothing to do with it. Adding tweens does NOT make the animations longer in time, it just makes them look smoother.

Please let's get back to the topic.
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Post » Fri Dec 25, 2009 5:38 pm

I found a plugin for (free) VirtualDub called MSU Motion Estimation.

Didn't try it, give it a go and let me know :D

but yeah, you should be able to go from 17-20 keyframes per second to a sweet 60 without much trouble.

HOWEVER:

-enlarge the sprites
-use distinctive coloring (edges or full-color sprites) so the algorithm can make out shapes

Your results will be a little bit blurry... but when shrunk back down, that'll go away :)
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Post » Wed Apr 11, 2012 9:01 pm

Hi!

I don't know if somebody posted or recommended this book. This is a classic one that about animation for 2d cartoons, I use it like template. It's old but it has the principals of animation.

http://www.amazon.com/Cartoon-Animation-The-Collectors-Series/dp/1560100842

Cartoon Animation by Preston Blair.

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Post » Wed Apr 11, 2012 11:09 pm

I think what Lucid is looking for is reference to do "Rotoscoping"
Here you should find good source pictures/videos for that purpose:
http://www.3d.sk/

Just select search videos and you should find what you need.nemo2012-04-11 23:14:25
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Post » Thu Apr 12, 2012 1:36 pm

Thanks guys.
this thread is from 2009 :) but i'll want some references soon anyway
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Post » Thu Apr 12, 2012 2:35 pm

[QUOTE=lucid] Thanks guys.
this thread is from 2009 :) but i'll want some references soon anyway[/QUOTE]

Didn't notice that date. So is this rotoscoping possible in Spriter?
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Post » Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:13 pm

not yet nemo, but it's something I'll look into adding at some point. Plate is already full for 1.0, but it would be very useful.   Still though, setting up the video in the foreground and copying poses should work as well
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Post » Fri Apr 13, 2012 3:47 pm

[QUOTE=lucid] something like this:
[IMG]http://www.e-crit.com/running/muy_run_frames.gif">
but more detailed with more frames preferably
and not just running
it doesn't matter if it's a book, or a site (preferably a site)
but just a general reference to video footage taken from good reference views like this side view?

I've googled a bit for some, I'll google some more later and post here if I find something before anyone else posts[/QUOTE]

Going back to the original question. Lucid, those pictures are from Eadweard Muybridge's pioneering photographic work from the late 1800's. His photographs are THE essential photographic animation reference for human and animal motion, even still to this day, as far as I know. Here are the books with the collections of his photographs: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=muybridge

I own a copy of "The Human Figure in Motion" and it's a thick, extensive book, filled with complete sequences of photos like the one you posted. It has many many different male and female actions (walking, running, jumping, lifting, sitting, playing, etc), from different angles (side, front, some from back, 3/4, etc). You cannot go wrong with either that or "Animals in Motion". I believe that those two books cover Muybridge's entire collection of human and animal motion photographs.

Here's a little more about Muybridge: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muybridge

I think that the only way you can do better than his photos would be to shoot video for your own reference. If you choose to go this route, this open source video analysis software could come in handy: http://www.kinovea.org/en/

Good luck!shenan2012-04-13 15:57:48
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Post » Sat Apr 14, 2012 11:11 pm

Uhm ok. I didn't notice it was an old post! For rotoscoping, I would say the best is to watch live action movies or to record the actions you want to.
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