Are game develepors Poor?

Discuss game development design and post your game ideas

Post » Sat Apr 12, 2014 7:54 am

Luck is a far smaller factor for successful game making, than for something like writing a best selling book.

In game making, if you can produce a decent game, people will take notice, regardless of who you are. Yes, there's a small glass ceiling, but your limitations for breaking it are down to your resources (including talents) in making the decent game.
Compare this to writing. When was the last time you heard of a truly 'average' person making it in fiction? It doesn't happen. Unless you're already somebody, or have links to a group which will piggyback you, you won't even have permission to enter the room with a glass ceiling, much less break it.
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Post » Sat Apr 12, 2014 8:12 am

Luck is not about breaking through the ceiling. It is about making the correct game. We have unlimited games we can make, but only enough time to build a handful. Yes it could be educated guess, but lets be honest, no matter how much you know what people want, who can predict 100%. That is where luck comes in.

Getting noticed is not luck, getting people to play your game is not luck. Building a great game is not luck.
Luck is having built a game that hits the market at exactly the right time and finding a following that you had nothing to do with. Call it a runnaway success, that is what luck is - luck is the game has its own life, it choose to be made, it choose to connect with people , etc etc etc.

Not trying to get mystic, just trying to explain that even the best guesses shoot miss. Luck has a large impact on what game to make with so many good ideas to choose from.


Sidenote: Books are the same. If you write a book that connects with people at a level at the right time etc etc etc. You have a runnaway success. But we cannot plan, or even fathom what that connection will be or how people will react.
I know many books that touched something in a reader, and the reader(s) themselves made it a bestseller.
Right book at the right time - this is luck.
Right game at the right time - this is luck
etc
You think you can do these things, but you can't, Nemo!
Just keep reading.
Just keep learning.
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Post » Sat Apr 12, 2014 3:35 pm

In my opinion it's more of being active than luck.Having a base of players to play your game before you launch it is what I work on now.I am currently working on android gaming and it is more about social connections than about the game,and for those who make these type of games there are a few tips you can find on either internet or from your own experience.

I've seen great,great game on android that had like 1k downloads because they were not appealing at that time.

1 month ago a flappy bird clone could have made like 200 dollars a month or even more,now it's down and we are waiting for the next thing we can copy.

So you can make money without luck or experience in the domain,but you have to put time and a little bit of research in it.

Naji games are great as an engine to work on,but they lack graphics and that spark for making it appealing.
If I knew C2 as Naji do I could finish my game in weeks,but I don't so I need to rely on my skills.
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Post » Sat Apr 12, 2014 4:42 pm

Effort > Luck

Work hard and good things will happen.
Made Cosmochoria - www.cosmochoria.com
Currently working on Slayaway Camp - www.slayawaycamp.com
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Post » Sat Apr 12, 2014 5:56 pm

Sturgeons law - game development, as with any creative industry isn't qualification based, some kid in his bedroom can have a crack and so can an office of people at a mega-bucks company.

If you want job security look at industries with a qualification barrier, like a lawyers, doctors,pilots etc.
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Post » Sat Apr 12, 2014 6:24 pm

yes .... :)
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Post » Sat Apr 12, 2014 9:40 pm

So I read all the posts and I concluded this: To be not risk of starving when I grow up, I should work another money-making job and make games as hobbyist, in that way, I can do what I like and in addition get few bucks from it. am I right?
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Post » Sat Apr 12, 2014 10:17 pm

@Naji: That's not completely true. And maybe your first question was wrongly formulated.

It must be notified that that 95-5 percentage applies to independent game developers.
The game making industry is the strongest industry worldwide, making more than the movie industry for the past years.
In this industry, a lot of major companies offer more than decent salaries to their workers, namely developers, assets producers (graphic artists, musicians/sfx designers,...), etc...
Some people come out of schools where they learn those crafts and make a pretty decent amount of money in the next years.

If you want to embrace the game making career, you can select that path and enter the industry in big companies.
Now if you prefer/chose to go the independent road, it might be a safer road to indeed have a side-job that will make sure you have some income no matter what. But it's doesn't maybe make it always easy to keep on making game, because depending on the "day job", you have to struggle with fatigue, demotivation, etc...

Once again, you're still young, and at your age, you could just take advantage, learn/make as much games as possible and work well at school since the skills you learn there can be poured into your games anyway.
Then in a few years, you'll be able to make the point on what you know about making games and if it is worth it for you to go the independent road, or maybe try to join the industry in a "big company".
Once again, and has already been told to you in other threads you're so young, you have time on your side.


I see you going through those forums asking a lot of questions, apparently serious and enthusiast about making games, but it sounds like you don't really take in the answers given in the end.
At your age, make games, don't bother about the rest.
Listen to the feedback given on your games and improve them based on that feedback. Don't bother about the rest.
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Post » Sat Apr 12, 2014 10:43 pm

Kyatric wrote:@Naji: That's not completely true. And maybe your first question was wrongly formulated.

It must be notified that that 95-5 percentage applies to independent game developers.
The game making industry is the strongest industry worldwide, making more than the movie industry for the past years.
In this industry, a lot of major companies offer more than decent salaries to their workers, namely developers, assets producers (graphic artists, musicians/sfx designers,...), etc...
Some people come out of schools where they learn those crafts and make a pretty decent amount of money in the next years.

If you want to embrace the game making career, you can select that path and enter the industry in big companies.
Now if you prefer/chose to go the independent road, it might be a safer road to indeed have a side-job that will make sure you have some income no matter what. But it's doesn't maybe make it always easy to keep on making game, because depending on the "day job", you have to struggle with fatigue, demotivation, etc...

Once again, you're still young, and at your age, you could just take advantage, learn/make as much games as possible and work well at school since the skills you learn there can be poured into your games anyway.
Then in a few years, you'll be able to make the point on what you know about making games and if it is worth it for you to go the independent road, or maybe try to join the industry in a "big company".
Once again, and has already been told to you in other threads you're so young, you have time on your side.


I see you going through those forums asking a lot of questions, apparently serious and enthusiast about making games, but it sounds like you don't really take in the answers given in the end.
At your age, make games, don't bother about the rest.
Listen to the feedback given on your games and improve them based on that feedback. Don't bother about the rest.

@kyratic Thanks for this advice, I'm really grateful :D My goal was to work on a large game company and make my own games, but sometimes i feel hesitant. Actually I'm the 1st in my school, always get high grades, thus my dad wants me to be a doctor or an engineer, and earlier when I began making games and told him that I want to make games as a career, he discouraged me and made me feel bad, but I know he wants the best for me and want me to live better than him. That's why I'm asking all this questions about salaries and the industry.
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Post » Sun Apr 13, 2014 8:25 am

What @kyratic said.
And there are lots and lots and lots of great positions available with small and large game companies and the salaries are competitive and in some cases rival high paying specialist jobs (accounts, lawyers, dr, software engineers, etc etc)

THere is always money to be made... but that money flows to the best candidate for the job and requires you be the best if that makes sense. Because there are limited positions available at any given time in comparison to how many job seekers there are.

Continue to grow, and be better each day than you were the day before and you will never have an issue.
You think you can do these things, but you can't, Nemo!
Just keep reading.
Just keep learning.
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