C2 in formal education and grades

For educators around the world who use Construct 2 in classrooms

Post » Fri Apr 08, 2016 5:09 pm

Hi all! I'm a long time C2 user but I'm having my first experience using it in the context of education this year.

Most of my experience in teaching people how to use C2 has been in an informal sense - workshops to help people get started or going over tips and best practices or doing developer streams. However, my question is for those of you who teach C2 in a formal context, particularly in the US, where you have to fulfill mandated assessment requirements in the education system.

Basically, how do you approach grading? Do you focus on the general principles of game development they are learning or do you literally assess competency with the tool itself? If the latter, how do you define what skills or knowledge are being graded? What is the difference between a C student and an A student in terms of how well they know the tool?

Formal grading is something I have a natural aversion to simply because it is unfamiliar territory for me, but I know that it is an inescapable part of education for many of you. I am curious to hear how you approach it. Thanks!
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Post » Fri Dec 30, 2016 3:53 pm

Well, it's a bit late for an answer I guess, but try to focus on their logical thinking. Don't teach them and give grades based on how well they can click around a software, but how well do they know the logic. Did the student used a completely different method to solve the problem that you've learned? If it's a good solution, it should count as presenting the learned methods.
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Post » Wed Feb 08, 2017 11:23 am

Having been a teacher in treatment centers for many years I devised interesting ways to test that gave students with different ways of thinking a way to prove their skills and competency besides a written test.

For a test on C2 competency I would create a simple game scenario that uses say 6 major event components that all students should know how to use and then they have to write the script events and create a working game/model.

A second test would be to place deliberate errors in an event script that they must identify and fix and final test would be an ongoing demonstration of their competency in designing their own working game/model.

Based on those tests you should be able to give a letter grade 50% competence C, 75% B and above 90% an A.

I hate letter grades but they are still required by most schools.
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Post » Wed Feb 08, 2017 2:12 pm

@lamar How is your experience with teaching C2? How are the students reacted to the event-based programming?
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Post » Wed Feb 08, 2017 2:53 pm

glerikud wrote:@lamar How is your experience with teaching C2? How are the students reacted to the event-based programming?


I am retired from teaching now and did not teach a course on C2.

My comment is based on teaching other programming and game design courses but I would do it the same way.

I think C2 is a good engine to teach because the events are laid out logically.
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Post » Wed Feb 08, 2017 3:06 pm

lamar wrote:I am retired from teaching now and did not teach a course on C2.

My comment is based on teaching other programming and game design courses but I would do it the same way.

I think C2 is a good engine to teach because the events are laid out logically.

Thank you for your answer.
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