Game Industry: worth getting in to?

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Post » Sun Oct 23, 2016 2:44 am

I have a daughter who is about to graduate high school. IMHO she is a very good artist, and wants to pursue game design and all the things that go with it (character design, etc). I am a self-taught animator and compositor and stay pretty busy freelancing. She wants to go to a college/university and get a degree in graphic/game design, and I say just learn what you need to just start marketing yourself now. Still go to school, but you don't have to wait four years to start 'working' in the industry. If you can deliver environments and characters that are animated and ready to drop into games (or illustrate children's books, etc), you can start working now! Or get a real job and just pursue this on the side for fun (ie starving artist)?

Advice?
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Post » Sun Oct 23, 2016 4:00 am

I'm not sure how much help I can be, but I'll give you my take. (this advice coming from a designer/developer)


There will always be room in this industry for great artists. The faster she can find her niche, the better. (at school or in the market)
(Pick a spot in the industry to study or work on... For example: 2D, 3D, concept art)

Whatever the route she takes, she needs to be focused on adding value. Keep doing actual work toward her end goal (and projects, as they will lead her to more profitable areas)

When she is looking at areas to study or grow in, I highly recommend she look on freelance websites like Upwork.com (or similar places) to find things that are actually in demand. (and price ranges) to make sure it's an actual area that makes anything.

(Advice to Her ^, advice to you \/)

But I think the biggest thing you are asking is, go to school, or do it on the side...
I would let her decide, but give her one condition... She has to set a time frame that if it's not working out within this time frame that she will do something else. (at least temporarily)

That way, her goals are real, and need to be acted on now or maybe never. (instead of checking Facebook again)



Whatever the case, I would love to see some of the art :D

Also, https://www.youtube.com/user/ExtraCreditz this channel for any game designer (if that's the right term) has so much info that is definitely work a look for her!

I hope my rambling can be of some help!
Justin
Eat ALL THE BACON!
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Post » Sun Oct 23, 2016 4:43 am

I'll preface this by saying you shouldn't take anything I say too seriously, because I don't know what is best. What works for someone might not work for someone else..

I think the main benefit of schooling is that you get taught whatever is being currently used/practiced in the industry, so that when you're done with it you can expect to seamlessly transition into the workplace.
It's the school's job to know what the student needs, etc. So if you aren't going to school, you have to do extra work figuring all that out, and you also may not have access to everything, such as specific tools.

That being said, I'm a self-taught artist, and managed to get into the industry when I was 16 or 17. Straight out of highschool I moved and work full-time for 5th cell media, but I had been doing work while I was in highschool related to game-art too.
There were less people doing what I was doing back then, so maybe it was easier than it is now, and also technologies have changed- so expectations may have risen.

A lot of people who have gone to school and gone to work at game companies have also gone on to a more independent route, because chances are a person isn't going to be able to fulfill all their creative desires creating what others want them to create instead of what they themselves want. I know people who have worked at major game companies who are now choosing on their own to do their own thing instead, because for them it is more rewarding that way even though it doesn't pay much if at all.

I feel like, if a person isn't doing what they want to do already, what's going to make them continue doing it later?? Everything I have done has always been an extension of the things I've already done. I've been doing art all my life, and game dev related stuff for almost 20 years now. As it looks, It seems like I'll continue doing it, but in what shape or form, I'm not sure- but I'm at least doing it.

I'd say whatever helps her do what it is she is doing, would be good, whatever it is. But, I don't have a kid, and I'm only 30 years old with 2/3rds of my life inside my games/art- what do I know about life.. :P
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Post » Mon Oct 24, 2016 2:07 am

Thanks for the advice guys.
Here are some examples of her recent artwork. She free-hand sketches into Photoshop on her Surface tablet.
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Post » Mon Oct 24, 2016 2:22 am

I'd tell her to stay away from the anthropomorphic stuff.
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Post » Mon Oct 24, 2016 2:49 am

I'd tell her to stay away from the anthropomorphic stuff.


Yes, so far she has only ever drawn for fun. It's just what she likes to draw.

I work with clients regularly, and I understand you have to deliver their idea, not necessarily your own.

Would a regular graphic design course be of value? Neither of the two local universities offer anything on game design etc.
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Post » Mon Oct 24, 2016 4:27 am

newt wrote:I'd tell her to stay away from the anthropomorphic stuff.

I don't agree at all. Human history is filled with anthropomorphism, from Greek mythology , ancient Egypt and religion to modern FUN games and educational books. Its in the human nature to see everything around as being human or having emotions.
Most fun games I played where anthropomorphic in nature.
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Post » Mon Oct 24, 2016 4:39 am

A degree is pretty much useless unless you want to get hired by a triple a developer.
If you do go that route make sure it's heavy in 3d, or code.

Also once you go furry, you don't go back.
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Post » Mon Oct 24, 2016 6:01 am

As someone, who never finished university, I can tell you that a degree is never a must. It does help, rather than hinder, but it's never mandatory (unless you want to be a doctor, lawyer, etc.).

I graduated high school less than 5 years ago and I am currently a team manager at a serious IT company, dealing with online advertisement. I am soon moving to a position in one of the top mobile tech sites as a journalist. And all this is done with just a high school degree and a lot of determination.

The best course of action here (in my opinion) is to just let your daughter decide what to do and support her the best you can.

Then again, I am not a parent, nor have I made any achievements in the gaming industry, so I could very well be wrong.
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Post » Mon Oct 24, 2016 7:08 pm

ehm, yes you have a good point, but if she likes drawing so much, you could infuse the idea of Architectural Designs in her mind, and not worry about (ie. Starving Artists).... you know why im saying that... Architects are like Doctors. She having the drawing skills is a good start, that is one requirement, the other is Mathematics if she studies good id say go for a Architect University, yes takes 6 -7 years but man once she finished it. She be making in a month as you did your entire life.

atleast that is my point of view, as for her love for drawing stuff for fun as she does now, cause she thinks is cool and her Daddy is in the business. she can do it part-time and learn while doing it.

As a side note: i have a few Graphic designers friends in university all where so enthusiastic at beginning about it, then 2nd year came and they where thinking to drop from the school.

Its best to ask her where she sees herself in this business in next 10 years, and if she has stuff in her mind with being a artist, and im not saying the commercial type, but the more fancy and not understood types(ie. staving artists) ... that is going to be a rough future for her, if she tends in that direction.

plus she just finishes high-school, you can model her idea of designing, and help her choose a career point. where as a woman she needs to be in future, and can sustain herself, and not depend on her future husband or worry where her next freelancer job will come from.

im thinking at your problem, as i see myself if i wold have a daughter.

and from my point of view, not worth it getting into game industry as a graphic designer.

The text above is just my opinion on the issue posted by the OP no pwn intended or trolling.
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