Hey artists! How do you make your tiles?

Discussion and feedback on Construct 2

Post » Fri Aug 14, 2015 7:41 pm

If you're serious about becoming a Game Developer don't skimp out on the software, those are the tools that will enable you to create what you want. When I had $200 in the bank I still dropped the $169 or w/e for the C2 Liscense and it was the best call I ever made.
Check out my first game Axes and Arrows and vote for A&A on Steam Greenlight!
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Post » Fri Aug 14, 2015 8:50 pm

Message: Smileh can only post plain text URLS until they have 500 rep. 1 URLS modified. Why?
Regarding the way to handle vector art in tiles, I still need some help in here!

jerryfriestad wrote:If you spend the couple of dollars to get Pyxel edit before you get more accustomed to other software itll make you a better pixel artist in the long run, not to mention it'll save you a ton of time.

I am trying to make the transition it's a very good program, but if you want a good simple freeware alternative I use GreenFish Icon Editor Pro http://greenfishsoftware.blogspot.com/2 ... r-pro.html

It's quicker and easier to figure out than most programs, but it lacks a lot of features that you would want. I use it for everything, even when I have a legitimate copy of Photoshop CC.


Alright I will give it a try thanks!

ryanrybot wrote:I would say no, you don't need any special tilemap programs.
Personally, I find tilemap software to be too limiting and just use Photoshop, which is something I'm more comfortable with. You could achieve very similar results with other programs, such as GIMP or Paint.NET, both of which are free.

It might be easier to make one base tile (say 32x32px) which you would duplicate and use as starting point for the rest of your tiles. It's also best to draw all your tiles in the same sheet, instead of as separate images so you can compare as you go, but if they all use the same base tile this shouldn't be a problem.
Most paint programs I know can set grids so you don't have to worry about misalignment, which is pretty much what tilemap programs do anyway.

I hope that helps.


That is exacly what I am doing right now. Thanks!

jerryfriestad wrote:If you're serious about becoming a Game Developer don't skimp out on the software, those are the tools that will enable you to create what you want. When I had $200 in the bank I still dropped the $169 or w/e for the C2 Liscense and it was the best call I ever made.


Thanks. For sure I want to grab some licenses. Also checked out your game, looks great! You using spriter for the animations?
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Post » Sun Aug 16, 2015 3:50 pm

Smileh wrote:Regarding the way to handle vector art in tiles, I still need some help in here!

jerryfriestad wrote:If you're serious about becoming a Game Developer don't skimp out on the software, those are the tools that will enable you to create what you want. When I had $200 in the bank I still dropped the $169 or w/e for the C2 Liscense and it was the best call I ever made.


Thanks. For sure I want to grab some licenses. Also checked out your game, looks great! You using spriter for the animations?


Nope I'm hand drawing them in Greenfish, and using a little bit of Pyxel Edit. All the screenshots out right now are actually dated, this is what it's looking like now...

http://i.imgur.com/0XSbSnt.png
Check out my first game Axes and Arrows and vote for A&A on Steam Greenlight!
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Post » Sun Aug 16, 2015 4:38 pm

Mind telling me how that exactly works? Don't understand the hand drawing part when you are doing your work in pyxeledit.

Btw I grabed a copy of pyxeledit myself

PS: Was talking about axes and arrows (the spriter question)
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Post » Sun Aug 16, 2015 4:52 pm

Smileh wrote:Mind telling me how that exactly works? Don't understand the hand drawing part when you are doing your work in pyxeledit.

Btw I grabed a copy of pyxeledit myself

PS: Was talking about axes and arrows (the spriter question)


That is Axes and Arrows, I completely changed the aesthetics for the game. I'm waiting till I've got all my assets done to go and update everything on the web for it too.

As in, I use the Circle tool, square tool, pencil tool, line tool, over and over and over until I get something that looks like what I want. For how to use the programs, there are dudes on YouTube that explain it way better than I could teach.

My only advice would be to always maximize, and work, turn off the grids if you're in Greenfish, you'd be surprised at how much easier painting a picture is when your canvas is the whole screen.
Check out my first game Axes and Arrows and vote for A&A on Steam Greenlight!
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Post » Sun Aug 16, 2015 6:30 pm

I wasn't exactly asking how to use the software, I am pretty decent with software in general, just lacking experience on how to proceed.

The thing you said about hand drawing before confused me. :P
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Post » Sun Sep 20, 2015 3:09 pm

Smileh wrote:I wasn't exactly asking how to use the software, I am pretty decent with software in general, just lacking experience on how to proceed.

The thing you said about hand drawing before confused me. :P


My bad, my process usually is,
-I will look at other people's pixel art for reference.
-Once I have an idea of what to go for draw it with a pencil on graphing paper (1x1 square block paper used in schools for Architecture graphs/tables and geometric patterns) You can probably get it at a bigger grocery outlet, if not an Office Supply store for sure.
-Then put that above my keyboard then zoom way in on Greenfish and just re-draw what I have on paper. I separate the parts I want to animate into layers, and just copy the object along a sprite sheet and then make the variations.

But again, we are all Game Developers, I'd check out
http://pixeljoint.com/forum/
https://www.reddit.com/r/PixelArt
http://pixel-artists.deviantart.com/
Check out my first game Axes and Arrows and vote for A&A on Steam Greenlight!
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Post » Mon Sep 21, 2015 5:08 am

You should develop an art style first and foremost. Afterwords, find out how to translate that art form into a game environment.

Look at this link, or rather, the artwork within it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_C%C3%A9zanne

That looks NOTHING like a Zelda game, yet it's the precise style they are using in Skyward Sword. You can't rightly tell for a very good reason (unless you have an eye for this). The reason lies in the difference between a book and a movie. Between art and moving art (or a game for example) things have to change to match itself (I hope that makes sense).

Now when it comes to tiles, you have to comprehend that the style of art you want might not work well as tiles but it CAN be incorporated if you take the time to do so. Artwork for a game is its own project, and not something to take lightly as a side-issue, but a full-fledged "needs attention" part of the process.

For this very reason, as a game developer and semi-okay artist, I like to take graphics from other people. I use placeholders and once I have a game how I like it to be, THEN I focus on drawing my own art for translation into sprite form.

I hope this helped!
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