Hobbyists - How do you make it happen?

Discuss game development design and post your game ideas

Post » Fri Mar 21, 2014 4:10 pm

@silverforce: ...hmmmm... interesting story.... academic or industrial research? ...ahhh... either way is bad pay... :)
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Post » Fri Mar 21, 2014 9:00 pm

moxBorealis wrote:@silverforce: ...hmmmm... interesting story.... academic or industrial research? ...ahhh... either way is bad pay... :)


Academic. Pay is meh for the work load (12 hr days, go into lab anytime work required it, sometimes I get in at 3AM) and prospects to have a stable career in Academia is extremely low given the positions available and the number of applicants, most of whom are willing to sacrifice more (ie family, to work 16hrs a day) to attain it than myself.

But as I've said, currently I work 12-16hrs day on my games, pay is near non-existant hehe. But at least I am a happy man doing what I love and able to work from home and watch my kids grow up. If I ever become successful, then indeed, its a dream come true. Life is short, spend it doing what you love.
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Post » Fri Mar 21, 2014 10:32 pm

I'm in the same place.. little time and lots of distractions .. sorry can't get rid of the kids.

My advice is the same as EXCAL's, starting small, start with something that can give an immediate kick back that you'll like.. that's the joy of "print hello world".. quick and works.

It needs to be fun and it needs to feel as if you are progressing. Don't look at the big picture, look at each step along the way. To do that, you will need to do some analysis of what you want to do in order to find useful small steps. I find that bit much more fun than coding... then start small.. make an icon, a map, detect keyboard/touch input, make the guy on the screen doing something/anything.

small steps, keep it fun and keep it moving along... no matter how slowly.

I've watched the indie scene.. some people can dedicate a lot of time to their programmes and can deliver fast, others take years.. just don't stop and pause.
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Post » Sat Mar 22, 2014 12:34 am

A genius idea can happen anytime and everywhere, but an idea is not a game...

1: Always have something to take note or draw an idea.

2: Test the core gameplay mechanic with a prototype. The prototype is a good place to start. It validate to yourself if the project has a potential and if it's fun. If you test and it sucks, try another idea.

3: Ask a friend or comunity users if they like it. Post a prototype to the Scirra Arcade service and ask comment only related to gameplay.

4: Create a Game Desgin and level document.

5: Now you have something, don't waste your time on graphic and visual at this time. Just build the levels, menus and code.

6: Balance your game and keep learning on everything related to videogame.

7: Make your game pretier, try the first level, then post a DEMO. It's the second test to know if people like your game and it shows that you have worked on your game.

8: Found the best options to publish and promote your game.

9: Open a bottle champaign and spend all your money considering that your game has made you Rich $
Create HTML5 games
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Post » Sun Mar 23, 2014 6:17 pm

@silverforce Yes, you described the situation quite accurately. Im myself involved in academic research and know firsthan........

byebye

p.s.
In what field were you working if i may ask?
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Post » Sun Mar 23, 2014 10:36 pm

moxBorealis wrote:@silverforce Yes, you described the situation quite accurately. Im myself involved in academic research and know firsthan........

byebye

p.s.
In what field were you working if i may ask?


Molecular Biology, University of Geneva.
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Post » Fri Apr 04, 2014 7:54 pm

rosareven wrote:Games have evidently became quite an industry that most developers are feeding their families with. At the same time though, successful indie developers are mostly hobbyists to begin with. I have been closely following Construct 2 community updates, but for a long time I haven't been able to shake off my procrastination due to my other distractions in life.

To all you non-professionals out there, how do you kick-start your project?

Do you have an idea first, and then either experiment the idea in practice (say, fiddling with Construct 2 functions), making mindmaps, or writing a plan down in paper first?

Or do you experiment with the engine first, and idea comes later?


It varies a lot for me to be honest, if im on to just test something, ill just go straight into it, not caring about whether its organised or not. It pretty much have one goal which is to solve a very specific problem or test something. While other projects start organised with some kind of weak idea of how it should be, and then slowly it gets disorganised and I forget what I wanted to do, or get distracted by another idea, and the project dies (Which happens A LOT).

So this time I try to focus more on good organisation and lot of documentation, so I don't forget what features, rules, stats and ideas it was I had when I started. So its very detailed currently 45 pages of A4. Also I have changed approach so I try to focus on making things more slowly and not just rush them, so its not enough that they just sort of work and then ill just fix it later, and when you have done that 30 times nothing works :D, So I aim for things to work 100% or as close to, with those things that it should work with and that have been made already. At least so far it seems to work the best for me, as I haven't dropped it yet :D

But I think its a good idea if you want to do something, that you locate the things that you think would give you the most problems, and just make some test programs that focuses specifically on those things, as its quite easy to notice where problem might occur and then get some ideas of how to solve them if its turns out to be the case.
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Post » Sat Apr 12, 2014 11:44 am

rosareven wrote:...but for a long time I haven't been able to shake off my procrastination due to my other distractions in life.

To all you non-professionals out there, how do you kick-start your project?

Do you have an idea first, and then either experiment the idea in practice (say, fiddling with Construct 2 functions), making mindmaps, or writing a plan down in paper first?

Or do you experiment with the engine first, and idea comes later?


I think the idea should come first. I mean, if you are aiming to make something that is polished that other people will be prepared to pay for I think you need to do extensive planning and concepting before you ever start programming.

For me... Im a visual creative not a programmer. I can clearly visualize the kind of game I want to make, and make the graphics for it.. but I lack the coding skills to build it. So im coming to C2 hoping that it will be simple enough for me to be able to use.

I have been 'kick-starting' my project by working on the artwork and the game concept:

-sketches of player and non-player characters.
-sketching out tile maps for different environments.
-drawing flow charts to show user navigation through menus and gameplay etc.
-writing out a story arc.
-sketching out level design.
-building artwork in Photoshop (tilesets, character animations, user interface graphics etc.)

So I've done all of this work without even thinking about coding.. At the same time, I have been completing contract jobs making artwork for other people's games, which has been very valuable because it gives me practice making game art in a wide range of styles..

Now I have reached a point where I want to make a working demo of one or two levels for my game concept, using the draft artwork I have. So I'm going to start with the free version of C2 and see if I can make something that vaguely resembles the concept I have in my head... and if I can achieve that, I will push on, buy a business license and aim to build a complete game.
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Post » Wed Jul 16, 2014 12:03 am

Have an idea. Throw a prototype together to see if the mechanics work. Then ideas usually just spawn from playing the prototype. At least that's how it works for me.
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Post » Wed Jul 16, 2014 1:21 am

I have an idea, I might write it down or make some art, maybe even start making it. And then.... I move on to something else and never touch the idea again.
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