How do you manage your project?

Discuss game development design and post your game ideas

Post » Tue Mar 12, 2013 12:19 am

I use kanban, helps me keep focusd'
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Post » Thu Mar 14, 2013 2:10 am

I use event groups and comments on every major events block. Helps keep things organized and if I ever have to figure out what a section of events does, I read the comment above, saving time because I don't have to run through the events and figure out what it does by following the logic.

Have a habit of taking a small break every 30 minutes of development to reorganize your event sheets, add comments, etc. It pays off in the long run.
Project Lead of Zems Online Card Game

Producer at Impulse Limited
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Post » Thu Mar 14, 2013 1:28 pm

Yeah, i developed some kind of OCD with those Groups. There's always a better way to organize them.

Kanban, i never heard of it, but i also used (when i was forced to code) this kind of flow charts. Now i do quick ones on paper because, somehow, it's faster to prototype in C2 than drawing the concept on a chart.
But this will be a must for big concept games (micromanagements, rpg, AIs, etc)

I ditched my first implementation of "object controller" for thoose Groups. In the end they do the same thing. And you don't need a sprite and there's also quick ways to disable them.

Just to throw some logs to the fire, How do you tackle the multiplatform barrier? (that's for everybody)
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Post » Mon Apr 08, 2013 8:56 pm

I am making a semi linear RPG.

Personally I use the dictionary/json method to managing my variables, the centralization is very liberating. I dont have any local variables so far. As for events, I use group containers to organize my events with a few comments and I use sub-folders to house all my objects. as soon as I get a result I am satisfied with, EVERYTHING goes into a container, nothing gets to float freely.

I am a very visual person so I often draw up flow charts using lucid. I am using the free version so I keep each one pretty small and save them individually so that I can re-tool them later if I need to.

I store my project files on google drive and alternate between the lables "work" and "home", usually marked as "project4-4Work.capx" so that I know where I uploaded it from. I like to keep 5 previous project files on my work pc, home pc and google drive and delete the older ones as I go.

This system works well for me right now as I am a solo developer so when I get the rest of my team involved I will have to make some habit changes unfortunately.
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Post » Tue Apr 09, 2013 4:05 pm

Nice addition Alexixiv!
I wonder who much you can do without relying on local variables. Your method of jsoning variables could solve many of my initial questions about how to "debloat" an object. Maybe you can tell more about this to us.

I also do flowcharts but (silly) i do them on paper. Somehow, i don't know if it's C2 graphic programming or what, but prototyping a concept or mechanic is so fast that going to a second program, to draw a quick flow is a test to my cofee-made anxiety. I guess i better use a program for bigger games or when i add saves with the new feature.

I'm blambling too much again. I also used google drive before switching to Dropbox.

I'm also trying to condense as much as possible everything to functions. Without actual code i lose focus all the time trying to figure what and what not to make into a function. Damn me.
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Post » Tue Apr 09, 2013 5:37 pm

I once went to a web design conference where a guy did a presentation about his ideal starting project. In it he showed his folder structure, and where he would put all his files, so that all of his projects were always neat and tidy, and probably most importantly they were standard across all his projects.

He believed it allowed him to get started on a web project really quickly, and meant he could edit previous projects without wasting time learning how it all worked.

I wondered if anyone has create a similar project structure like this in C2, and if they'd like to share?

Or is it too impossible as no one game project is the same?
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Post » Tue Apr 09, 2013 9:27 pm

C2 actually makes it's own folder structure. The one you see when you save as a project. Then depending on the final export could change but usually project structure only matters on design/programming phase.

Then you also have internal folders on c2 editor. Here you better do as Alexixiv said before, make a subfolder for every area (sounds, music, graphics, backgrounds, etc). But also you should add more and more subfolders so you can track easily (and so your team) any file.

I usually divide my files into: Graphics/Enemies/Level1 or something like that. Sprites/Enemies/Generic and so for sounds, backgrounds. Nothing in the air.

Finally containers should be "thinked" as some dangerous but very handy kind of organization. Requires deep previous knowledge about how everything will work. But it pays in the end.

Foldering a project is a matter of your own sense of order. No one will order better your "stuff" than you.
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