How much do I have to charge for a game

Discuss game development design and post your game ideas

Post » Tue Oct 15, 2013 10:24 pm

Hi!
well, I have developed a Demo using C2 and I have to say... I'm in love with it, I like so much C2.

So this is the history, my customer needs to know, how much will I charge, I know, this is a very hard question because there are to many factors involved, but I'll really appreciate any kind of help.


this is the game description:

A platform game (Like Mario bros for Nes) with five worlds.

I'll develop the game, the music, basically the graphics (the graphics will be kind of angry birds, smooth, clean and with fun colors).

develop the game for 5 platforms (android, IOS, Windows phone, web)

as far, that what I got, I'm systems Engineer, so it would help to apply a just charge (I guess).

thanks for the help! any comment is great!
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Post » Wed Oct 16, 2013 5:42 am

Hard to say. Try to estimate how long it will take you as best as you can. Break it apart into individual tasks if that helps, and give each one a low and high range. Multiply your max estimate by how much you want to charge per hour.

Then, until you get a better idea of how much time it takes for similar projects, multiply it by three. Or pi.
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Post » Mon Oct 28, 2013 8:37 pm

I'd say From $0.99 to $1.99
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Post » Mon Oct 28, 2013 8:43 pm

Current best practice is free with in game purchases - easier said than done. The number of "good" enough free apps is rising so it is more and more difficult to entice people to part with money - even if the amount is minuscule.
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Post » Mon Oct 28, 2013 9:37 pm

Free with ads (at least for ios and android). Use Admob.
Maybe $1 on windows phone
Clay.io ads for web?
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Post » Tue Oct 29, 2013 12:48 pm

You're talking about charging a client to develop the game, right ?
As an engineer, I'd aim for approx 50-100$ per hour of development over the course of the project, depending on how many games you have released previously.

Now as you need to plan for the dev time upfront, if you lack past experiences there, you just need to make a bet + add a fair amount of safety workdays, and eventually lower your cost estimate later, as the contract unfolds.
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Post » Tue Nov 05, 2013 6:58 pm

I'd check out stack exchange for more answers on how much you should charge someone you're making a game for.

Unlike art, coding commissions are more costly the better quality of a game you put out.

You could make a basic game, basic tiles, and setup 5 worlds within 2 days and charge $50-100 or something depending on how much time it'll take up. Or you could charge more and do more work. You could charge and hourly rate as well if needed.

I assume since you have no experience in doing this you're just starting out, so I would say try not to rip them off but try to do good work. Once you get used to doing it you'll have more confidence in what you can do VS how much you feel comfortable charging for.

Just remember don't over-estimate yourself at the start because you'll only screw both you and your customer.
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Post » Tue Nov 19, 2013 3:08 pm

I reckon charging on Games can be vary on it`s production cost.
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Post » Tue Nov 19, 2013 3:37 pm

This is tough question. On one part you need to make sure you are getting paid a fair amount for your work. On the other, you have to make sure that the client is paying a fair price. The dilema is that most peoples quote equates to them getting grossly underpaid or not getting paid at all.


What is the client's budget. Important to know that very few will want to disclose their budget because they want to hire you for the least amount possible. Try using a project discovery worksheet and hand it to them to fill out. It should ask questions about their desired outcome, timeframe, and of course, budget (important to assure them that this is not for quoting purposes, but to better "explore" possibilities). A $1 pixel image on budget is not the same as a $1500 Photoshop'd high quality image.
Clients seem to be more forthright when they understand you want whats best for the project within their budget.

Spend lots of time on your proposal. If you get it wrong, it is going to hurt (your pocket, your portfolio, future contacts) Remember, clients memories are not writen in stone. always create a proposal and always put in the time to make sure it covers everything (So nobody can say - I told you...) Make sure it covers both client and contractor responsibilities, expectations, requirements, payment terms, terms for changes outside the proposal, and everything else you can think of. Since clients often have a larger scope in mind than they communicate, a couple hours on this document could save you dozens later.

Always, charge by the hour. A base fee (your hourly rate x expected hours x OOPS TIME (10 to 20%), plus add any additional hours over base fee at 80% - 90% of your hourly rate. A project is never finished - ever. Don't let the client abuse you with unallocated time.

Always up your estimated cost by 10%-20%. You will loose work over this, but especially if you are new, it will save you in the long run. So do yourself a favor and give yourself enough time (because asking a client for more time/money is generally not a good habit).

Most Important - Collect fees up front. Or at least 50% up front and X% at a predetermined milestone(s).
Make sure that the 50% covers your costs up to milestone 1, because so many clients abandon projects. (Don't Pay)
You think you can do these things, but you can't, Nemo!
Just keep reading.
Just keep learning.
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Post » Wed Nov 20, 2013 7:42 am

[QUOTE=DUTOIT] This is tough question. On one part you need to make sure you are getting paid a fair amount for your work. On the other, you have to make sure that the client is paying a fair price. The dilema is that most peoples quote equates to them getting grossly underpaid or not getting paid at all.


What is the client's budget. Important to know that very few will want to disclose their budget because they want to hire you for the least amount possible. Try using a project discovery worksheet and hand it to them to fill out. It should ask questions about their desired outcome, timeframe, and of course, budget (important to assure them that this is not for quoting purposes, but to better "explore" possibilities). A $1 pixel image on budget is not the same as a $1500 Photoshop'd high quality image.
Clients seem to be more forthright when they understand you want whats best for the project within their budget.

Spend lots of time on your proposal. If you get it wrong, it is going to hurt (your pocket, your portfolio, future contacts) Remember, clients memories are not writen in stone. always create a proposal and always put in the time to make sure it covers everything (So nobody can say - I told you...) Make sure it covers both client and contractor responsibilities, expectations, requirements, payment terms, terms for changes outside the proposal, and everything else you can think of. Since clients often have a larger scope in mind than they communicate, a couple hours on this document could save you dozens later.

Always, charge by the hour. A base fee (your hourly rate x expected hours x OOPS TIME (10 to 20%), plus add any additional hours over base fee at 80% - 90% of your hourly rate. A project is never finished - ever. Don't let the client abuse you with unallocated time.

Always up your estimated cost by 10%-20%. You will loose work over this, but especially if you are new, it will save you in the long run. So do yourself a favor and give yourself enough time (because asking a client for more time/money is generally not a good habit).

Most Important - Collect fees up front. Or at least 50% up front and X% at a predetermined milestone(s).
Make sure that the 50% covers your costs up to milestone 1, because so many clients abandon projects. (Don't Pay)[/QUOTE]


Great post     love the idea of the project discovery works sheet !! *assimilates*
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