How to make video games for a living ?

Ideas and discussion about publishing and distributing your games

Post » Tue Jan 10, 2017 12:47 am

Thanks @true-valhalla it really helps a lot :-D

I guess I'll take some time to create a few games (and read your ebook which seems very interesting ;-) ) before contacting publishers then ^^

=> Starting with small games for publishers to get regular incomes and improve myself, and then try Kickstarter and Steam Greenlight for bigger projects seems to be a good solution for me, what do you think ?
Hello !



I'm Steven, a 24 years old French graphic designer and programmer, and it's been 4 years since I started using Construct 2.
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Post » Tue Jan 10, 2017 1:27 am

My strategy has basically been to use small HTML5 games to fund my bigger ambitions. This year I have started working on an MMORPG called Kingfall, which is a dream project of mine, and it has been funded by my smaller games.

I'm not a fan of relying on platforms like Kickstarter. I'd rather be as self-reliant as possible.
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Post » Tue Jan 10, 2017 1:24 pm

@true-valhalla I understand and I think too it's good to be self-reliant if it's possible.
I was though wondering if Kickstarter may help promote the game and develop a community around it before a greenlight. According to the website "There are no fees if a project is not successfully funded." so even if the kickstarter fails, the game still gains notoriety and people who wanted to support it could still do it in the future ^^
Hello !



I'm Steven, a 24 years old French graphic designer and programmer, and it's been 4 years since I started using Construct 2.
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Post » Sun Jan 22, 2017 3:30 pm

True Valhalla wrote:
Sonable wrote:My advice would be to look at the http://www.truevalhalla.com blog. Matthew makes HTML5 games and licenses them to different mobile publishers and game portals, these kind of licensing deals give him a regular income, though as you will see, they are declining and he has had to concentrate on other things to maintain his income. It's still very inspirational to see it CAN be done.


Thanks for the mention!

I just want to rectify one part of your comment: my HTML5 income has not been declining, in fact, 2016 was my most profitable year ever. On average, I earned slightly over $10,000 USD per month, which was mostly from HTML5 games.


True Valhalla, I also need a few answers :)

So, you actually make a game and sell it to some company and they are using it as their own, right?
How do you find potential buyers?
Why don't you publish your games on Google Play and monetize them with ads?
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Post » Wed Jan 25, 2017 11:51 am

sivricmarijan wrote:True Valhalla, I also need a few answers :)

1. So, you actually make a game and sell it to some company and they are using it as their own, right?
2. How do you find potential buyers?
3. Why don't you publish your games on Google Play and monetize them with ads?


I'm glad to help :)

1. I make games and 'license" them to companies. They don't buy the game, they buy a license to use the game.

2. That's discussed in quite some detail within my book Making Money With HTML5.

3. I have a lot of games. There is so much maintenance involved with a large portfolio, and my games are not built for the iOS/Android markets, so I'm not confident that the profit vs. maintenance ratio would be worth it. Basically, I believe my time is better spent extending my position within the niche I'm already profitable in.
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Post » Mon Jan 30, 2017 2:12 am

I started publishing materials (not games) over 20 years ago and most never made much money and then I found a niche with lots of followers and I wrote for that niche and built up a large amount of subscribers that follow my work and the result was I was able to retire and live comfortably from that work and royalties will continue even after I am gone.

The key is to find a niche and be the best at creating for that niche. For example there are new Zombie games created every day and most never make any money and the market is saturated.

BUT there are a whole lot of little boys and girls that need and their parents want educational games so make educational games with a Zombie theme and you have a niche no one else is doing.

Next you should not expect to get rich overnight with one game creation. You might and get very lucky developing the next Minecraft but chances are you won't and that is OK.

There are 3 ways to become a millionaire. Have a rich family member and inherit it. Sell something worth a million dollars or sell something worth $5 for $1 to a million people.

Create a great product with lots of features and then make it available for an unbelievable low price or include adds that generate ongoing revenue and publish it for free. Not many people have a million dollars to buy anything but everyone has a buck to spend on something really worth a lot more.

Create alternate streams of revenue from your games and advertising, youtube videos, and addons and sprite packs are all ways to get people to drop a buck to support an ongoing game with good support.

Donations and kickstarter for new projects with real potential can also be used but make sure you follow through on your commitment to produce the game.

Developing a following and using social media and even paid advertising can greatly boost sales and get your product noticed and once you get a following ask them to help promote your game by setting up a forum and keeping your customers notified of updates and addons.

So, you can spend your time trying to create the perfect million dollar game and some people get lucky but even many professionally designed games fail to generate interest or you can focus on developing many games and when one is getting a lot of interest and developing followers that is the one to focus your attention on and make it go viral using social media and you will start generating income.

Each game you create is an investment in your design skills and the more games you create the better and faster you get at designing games so invest in your skills, make lots of games and be the best at the niche your choose and the money will follow.
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Post » Mon Jan 30, 2017 6:28 am

Sonable wrote:This topic comes up a lot on the r/gamedev subreddit. 95% of the community there program their games in small chunks on evenings and weekends and hold down a full time job. This is a super slow way to do it but you don't have to worry about money ...


As I follow this path I can comment a little. It really takes a lot of time. And time is a big negative effect, but a good point here is that you have a lot of time to think through your game.

And you are in no rush - just making your game slow but steadily, one step a time.
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Post » Mon Jan 30, 2017 6:33 pm

@true-valhalla @lamar @NoSoul8
I'm glad so many people share their experience and advice in this thread, thank you very much :-D
I'm working on it little by little, and I hope it will be ok ^^
Hello !



I'm Steven, a 24 years old French graphic designer and programmer, and it's been 4 years since I started using Construct 2.
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Post » Fri Feb 03, 2017 3:10 pm

Ratmaster wrote:@true-valhalla @lamar @NoSoul8
I'm glad so many people share their experience and advice in this thread, thank you very much :-D
I'm working on it little by little, and I hope it will be ok ^^


Construct 2 community is great! =D
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