How usefull is C++ for you cool guys who knows it?

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Post » Thu Aug 12, 2010 2:20 pm

This might be a really stupid idea, i don't know since i don't know how this stuff really works, but wouldnt a Python SDK be nice? I guess many people will learn python now because of its part in construct, wouldn't a python sdk result in much more people being able to contribute with plugins?
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Post » Thu Aug 12, 2010 3:16 pm

I love c++, and I'm partially biased because over the last 10 yrs ago before I learned it. It was always the answer when I considered learning a language and asked or looked up "what's the main language people use to make games nowadays?"

That may be changing, I haven't checked up lately, but also, id have to say, a really great way to learn is making plugins for construct, don't do what I did, and start trying to make a super important plugin like spritefont before you're fairly comfortable, but its very rewarding and motivating to apply what you learn in a c++ book with boring examples, and use it to move sprites around, and give yourself math expressions for your own game.

If you're serious about making a largescale game in construct its more about complexity and how much goes on per tick, if you have so much complex stuff going on that ot hurts your head to look at, and you're doing similar things over and over in different places, then its worth making a plugin if the function object won't work for readability or because its something that needs to happen for too many different objects.
Also, if you start doing loops with actions that going into the 10s of thousands,constructs runtimeinterpretter wil be a bottleneck where a plugin would be able to do do the work of thousands of event calls with a single action.

As far as python sdk, you don't really need one. I meant to post an example at some point but you can make python functions and classes that you could copy paste as text on the forums that you could plugin different construct objects into like a behavior in a way. Besides, anyone who could make a plugin in python could do so in c++. They're so similar its nuts
Spriter Dev
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Post » Thu Aug 19, 2010 6:01 pm

If you have any interest in developing games professionally, especially on consoles, it's basically mandatory to learn C++.

If you want to make independent games for the PC (or the 360!), or develop a skillset to be a professional non-games programmer, or whatever, learn C#. You can always learn the nitty-gritty of C++ later if you feel the need, and by the time that rolls around, who knows, the whole games industry could have changed.

Alternately, if you want to make some decent money, go learn Java and make games for Android phones. That's a huge emerging market right now.
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Post » Thu Aug 19, 2010 11:02 pm

For now i'm just going to work on the game i'm making now. Right now i'm only using construct. It's not really professional, but i plan to sell parts of it. And i want to learn anything that makes the whole process of making a large game easier.
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Post » Tue Aug 24, 2010 8:00 pm

XNA Games Studio uses C# and you can create Xbox360 and Pc games with C#.And it's much easier than C++.The one thing i don't like about C++ is al the linker stuff that you have to code.I love C# aka Lite C.But when i use Construct im in heaven, Cause you can create almost any 2d game without going through miles and miles of code.Now if only the 3D apps could be half as easy as Construct that would be wonderful.
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Post » Wed Sep 01, 2010 11:58 pm

Truthfully, I think you're asking the wrong question. C++ is a tool, and like any tool, it has strengths and weaknesses. Construct, too, is a tool with strengths and weaknesses. The most important question is, are you using the right tool for the job?

You've said nothing about what your game is, what its goals are, and what you're ultimately trying to make; so there's no good answer to receive.

If you want to make games, you should know how to program. At this point, for you, that means start learning something. Truthfully, it doesn't matter what language you use so long as you can understand it and use it to its potential. Likewise, the language must support whatever it is you are trying to accomplish.

C++ has a ton of support, examples, and projects you can use to achieve your goals. But then, so does Python. So does C#/XNA. And the list goes on. I encourage you to use what works best for you, and what will make your game more of a possibility. Think first about your target, your goal, and your needs. No matter which route you go, it will contribute to making your projects more of a reality.

At some point you will realize it's less about the language, and more about the APIs you use (or make for yourself). Since it's asinine to sit down and write your own 3d API, you'll be looking at Ogre3D, Irrlicht, CrystalSpace... etc. ClanLib... SDL... Allegro... PyGame, PodSixNet... etc. See where I'm going with this?

People hail C++ as the best "game making" language, it's not that it makes games "better," it just gives an experienced programmer a lot more control. Control is important. However, if it's "too much" language for you, you can easily get stuck and discouraged because making progress can be harder than making progress in, say, Python or BASIC. And it's simply been around so long, it's more or less the standard for the way things are done. It's not better than Python, it's different. Lua isn't worse than Python, it's just different.

Whatever you decide on, stop talking about it, stop considering it, and start WRITING it.

"Taking 6 months to learn C++" is a silly thing to say, and it only emphasizes the lack of maturity you have about this topic. I've been coding for 15 years or more, and I still consider myself a learner.

- If I was going to write the next best 3d game with massive multiplayer support, I'd use C++.
- If I was going to write a small 2d game that's fun and more of a side project, I'd use Construct. Or PyGame.

And if you truthfully want to know which is more important to your development, it is hands down the second option there, because the ability to see a project through to completion far outweighs any delusion of granduer you may have about the first. And, it will get you to the first option MUCH quicker if that's where you want to go with your life (tip: option 1 requires a group of developers, hence why option 2 is m ore important for the soloist).
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Post » Thu Sep 02, 2010 2:08 am

Since you are very competent with C++ then for games I could switch to XNA Games Studio and C#. It seems to be the future for gaming, and the price is right ;-)
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