HTML5 is NOT right tool to make mobile games

Discussion and feedback on Construct 2

Post » Sat Mar 29, 2014 9:38 pm

Aurora Australis wrote:Just why should people throw out perfectly working phones every year or so, just to make you happy?

But that is what many people do (according to my experience) - I can't understand it, but after 1-2 years they boast about their brandnew phone
B
15
S
4
G
3
Posts: 52
Reputation: 1,513

Post » Sun Mar 30, 2014 2:59 am

I just have to say OP is going about this entirely the wrong way.

Native is not better than Html5 code. Nor is Html5 better than Native code.
The real question we as developers need to ask ourselves is WHEN it is appropriate to use one over the other or, perhaps use a hybrid.

The main advantage of native objective based languages is having access to a devices core features. Things that we cant access with Html5. Take Siri for example.
Is Native code going to be faster than Html5? Certainly. But at margins that we as developers can typically ignore.

Full fledged games honestly don't work or meet mobile demands. Oceanhorn was brought up. This is a console grade game. Tons of people bought it. But fewer took the time to sit down and complete it. Why? Because mobile users don't look for console grade games. When people want to play actual games or have the time for an actual game they go to the computer or consoles.

Mobile games for the most part are relatively simple, and don't have a ton going on. Html5 is perfect for this. Unless, like I mentioned you want access to some device specific functionality.
If you honestly need over 1000 sprites at any given moment . I think you are going about your game design poorly.

One of the key tricks to mobile development is faking things. If you want a living environment, don't create a few hundred sprites to bring the game alive. Create a background image, and animate a few places throughout. Use sprites to help in believing something but don't go all out in creating vast scenes of sprites.

The ONLY time I have had really bad lag issues with Html5 on mobile devices is when:
1. Testing on old outdated devices. These devices are generally not supported by even native developers so it is a non-issue
2. Testing over lan with debug mode. It kills the frame rate. I can go from playable smooth gameplay, turn on debug and BOOM game is stopped.
3. Thats actually about it.

I also have to mention this. You always hear developers having this conversation. Html5 or Native code. Which one is better?

But I think everyone reading this thread needs to realize is this:
The users, the people playing the games. They are not bringing this up.
Why?
Because they probably can't tell you the difference in Html5 apps vs Native.

I dont know about you. But My games are not targeted at developers who care if the game is Html5 or some objective based language.
My games are targeted to people that only care if the game works. And Html5 works just fine.
B
28
S
8
G
1
Posts: 226
Reputation: 2,865

Post » Sun Mar 30, 2014 5:14 am

@Tylermon Actually I disagree with you but there is no need to debate the issue.
B
99
S
35
G
29
Posts: 3,139
Reputation: 28,421

Post » Sun Mar 30, 2014 5:29 am

If you are targeting strictly mobile then the question is why did you go with HTML5 to begin with? That is the real question for anyone that is developing games. HTML5 is great and flexible but it is not the ideal platform for mobile games. The fact that it can export to them (Via third party exporters and wrappers) does not make it ideal for mobile. I love C2 for what it does, but for larger mobile games there are frameworks like Unity which work great. But they also do not allow you to just drag and drop.

Knowing your target platform and the limitations of the different development options are very important before trying to start any project which has a goal of being published for money. I have C2 for some of my projects and Unity for others. C2 gives a great balance of price vs. value. If you want a platform that is more tailored toward mobile than C2 you will need to either learn to program, or spend more money. There is always a trade off. Pick your poison :)
B
49
S
12
G
10
Posts: 1,833
Reputation: 14,603

Post » Sun Mar 30, 2014 5:54 am

@BluePhaze That's why I'm done with that.


About Unity3D, it does have precomputed Occlusion Culling solution, graphic optimizations, level of detail support and bottleneck reducer as Unity3d features, these features are required for big games, one more thing, Unity3D is not a browser-dependence.

I know it's not allowed to just drag and drop, only raw text editor which it's old workflow, however there a third party extension is called uScript, it's helping a lot to make visual scripting.
B
99
S
35
G
29
Posts: 3,139
Reputation: 28,421

Post » Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:13 am

braingame wrote:
Aurora Australis wrote:Just why should people throw out perfectly working phones every year or so, just to make you happy?

But that is what many people do (according to my experience) - I can't understand it, but after 1-2 years they boast about their brandnew phone

A non-small proportion certainly.
I actually might have one of the oldest mobile phones still in regular use. Its one great feature is..., wait for it..., a flash-light with all the light of a single Christmas light-bulb. Not bad as a throwing weapon though.
B
28
S
9
G
2
Posts: 154
Reputation: 2,868

Post » Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:57 am

@Ashley

yes, it has crappy Vivante GC800 chip, but it supports OpenGL; anyway even preinstalled educational apps (with many SWF files inside) plays sloowly
B
18
S
7
G
1
Posts: 783
Reputation: 4,247

Post » Sun Mar 30, 2014 6:51 pm

Aurora Australis wrote:
braingame wrote:
Aurora Australis wrote:Just why should people throw out perfectly working phones every year or so, just to make you happy?

But that is what many people do (according to my experience) - I can't understand it, but after 1-2 years they boast about their brandnew phone

A non-small proportion certainly.
I actually might have one of the oldest mobile phones still in regular use. Its one great feature is..., wait for it..., a flash-light with all the light of a single Christmas light-bulb. Not bad as a throwing weapon though.

I don't want to drive the discussion into another direction but do you really think your mobile phone is the oldest still in regulear use ?!? Can you top my 14 years old Nokia 6210 :D
B
15
S
4
G
3
Posts: 52
Reputation: 1,513

Post » Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:23 pm

Joannesalfa wrote:@Tylermon Actually I disagree with you but there is no need to debate the issue.

Then add to the discussion. You literally have a thread driven for debate and discussion on the topic. Picking and choosing which views to refute or rather dismiss hardly helps people make a decent decision on Html5 being or not being the right tool for their needs. It is possible I am not aware of some aspect of html5 that you are, or perhaps I know something about html5 that you didnt. I only ask you share your opinions because everyone can benefit and then form their own.

---------Back on the topic of Html5 vs Native----------
One is more than welcome to develop IOS apps in xcode, and then rewrite the same app for android, and write it again for windows. But most developers don't have that amount of time.
Html5 has a huge advantage of being written once and working on every device. For near native app performance simply use a wrapper and make a hybrid app platform specific.

Is Html5 perfect for every situation? Absolutely not. When you cross a line into needing high security and high performance. Native code is your best option...at least for now. And some platform specific features are not available from html5 based apps(yet).
But if getting to a market quickly and cost effectively for near native-like performance is what one desires. Html5+wrapper of choice is perfect.


I do have to say however, if one intends only to publish to lets say the apple store. One market, on only a handful of devices they should be making native apps.
---------------------------
And on the topic of fragmenting.

Html5 does have it pretty hard here. There are many browsers to consider, and each offer more or less functionality than the other. This is often a challenge with Mobile web apps. However, wrappers help negate some of those issues.

That does not go without saying that native apps don't have to worry about fragmentation. Just think of how many IOS versions are out there. Each version needing to be maintained. This goes for android and windows as well.

I still have to say fragmenting and these browser and device differences is the hardest part about Html5 development.

In the end it really comes down to personal needs. I wouldn't say "HTML5 is NOT [the] right tool to make mobile games". I might say 'Html5 is NOT the BEST tool to make mobile games' But I would say 'Html5 IS the BEST tool to make cross platform games'.
B
28
S
8
G
1
Posts: 226
Reputation: 2,865

Post » Mon Mar 31, 2014 9:53 am

I read the first page and I must say, if you're designing World of Warcraft on an old 8088 then you're SOL. BUT you can do something LIKE wow on an 8088 but you have to limit yourself. Same stuff, same options, just worse graphics/sounds. You always have to know your hardware before you work upon it, and making games is no different in this respect.
B
27
S
7
G
6
Posts: 268
Reputation: 3,852

PreviousNext

Return to Construct 2 General

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Tokinsom and 3 guests