I'm worried about the future.

Post » Fri Feb 17, 2017 7:14 am

Grandfather? For me it is Klik&Play, I used it so much back in mid 90s something. It is same company as the Fusion now and you can see similarity still.

And as for drag&drop game maker, it is too limiting in my humble opinion and would just make cookie cutter games. Again, in my opinion. Of course if you are going to make pretty graphics and have basic game idea that is same as existing then it will work.

But if you have novel idea (of new game style/engine) it will be very limiting quickly.
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Post » Fri Feb 17, 2017 7:44 am

lamar wrote:I foresee the future to be drag and drop 2D and 3D game creation.

You will choose from a plethora of of 2D or 3D characters and objects with pre-programmed but modifiable behaviors and effects and you will choose your layout, effects and scenery and type of game and just drop them in place and the engine does the rest.

No event scripting and just modify object settings for how you want them to behave.
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That would open up game design to many more artists that have no interest in programming or writing events.


Next thing you know is we'll have a game engine app that only requires you to push a button to make an awesome game and it'll do it. No other effort needed.

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Post » Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:53 am

I would say kliknplay to fusion 2.5 is the grandfather of construct2, and the paternal dad of construct classic.
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Post » Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:55 am

helena wrote:Grandfather? For me it is Klik&Play, I used it so much back in mid 90s something. It is same company as the Fusion now and you can see similarity still.

And as for drag&drop game maker, it is too limiting in my humble opinion and would just make cookie cutter games. Again, in my opinion. Of course if you are going to make pretty graphics and have basic game idea that is same as existing then it will work.

But if you have novel idea (of new game style/engine) it will be very limiting quickly.

Me too, I used klik n play when it was demo disc'd back in 94/95, I carried on with them thru click and create, the games factory and mmf1. I think fusion 3 will be something entirely new and satisfying.
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Post » Fri Feb 17, 2017 11:27 am

helena wrote:Grandfather? For me it is Klik&Play, I used it so much back in mid 90s something. It is same company as the Fusion now and you can see similarity still.

And as for drag&drop game maker, it is too limiting in my humble opinion and would just make cookie cutter games. Again, in my opinion. Of course if you are going to make pretty graphics and have basic game idea that is same as existing then it will work.

But if you have novel idea (of new game style/engine) it will be very limiting quickly.



What do you think you do with C2 but use built in effects and behaviors that they designed in?

You just set the effect and behaviors and the engine does the rest. You don't create new effects or behaviors in C2 just use them through the settings.

That is just a natural progression to where game design is headed.
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Post » Fri Feb 17, 2017 11:38 am

lamar wrote:
Rayek wrote:I assume he meant Fusion 3.



I wouldn't say Fusion is the grandfather of 2D game engines sorry.


It's not the grandfather of 2d game engine, but it is the grandfather of the event sheet that construct is using - and visual programming in general :D
Heck, ashley even wrote plugins for it prior to creating construct.

Clickteam devs got upset when construct came out- with the obvious similarities. They got really butthurt and still are. This time around they are coming out with an editor and engine that takes care of all of the reasons people moved away from fusion to use construct .They have even stated on their forum that they will later this year reveal news about fusion3 that will make construct users happy. So you can see that they know about construct and are actively competing

Out of the three Godot is the one that is actually most powerful, but it is also the one that requires more investment of time to learn.
With the changes Juan added to gdscript, the language has become piss easy though- you can make a platformer movement with animations and input in about 40-50 lines of code.Godot devs don't give a crap about any of the other 2 engines, they just keep adding and fixing stuff

We can talk about it, but things will be most obvious when all three are out and about.
I believe that all three will be successful in their own way - construct3 may be driving away some users due to the licensing and the cloud, but in the process it will acquire new users that like that kinda stuff
Last edited by blurymind on Fri Feb 17, 2017 12:00 pm, edited 5 times in total.
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Post » Fri Feb 17, 2017 11:38 am

A little history of game design software:

Early game creation systems such as Broderbund's The Arcade Machine (1982), Pinball Construction Set (1983), ASCII's War Game Construction Kit (1983),[4] Thunder Force Construction (1984),[5] Adventure Construction Set (1984), Garry Kitchen's GameMaker (1985), Wargame Construction Set (1986), Shoot'Em-Up Construction Kit (1987), Mamirin / Dungeon Manjirou (1988), and Arcade Game Construction Kit (1988) appeared in the 1980s on home computers. 3D Construction Kit was released on the ZX Spectrum in 1991, and contained a full polygon-based world creation tool. Most of these early design frameworks are specific to one or another genre.

In 1990s, game creation systems for the IBM PC shifted both to the more general and the more specific. Whereas frameworks like RSD Game-Maker and Klik & Play attempted to accommodate any genre, communities grew around games like ZZT (later, MegaZeux[6]) that permitted such extensive user modification that they essentially became de facto game creation systems. Pie in the Sky Software created a full on 2.5D first-person shooter creator out of an engine they previously used internally, which sold in three total versions until 2003.

Later in the mid-2000s, with the growth of the World Wide Web and social networking, programs like BlitzBasic and Multimedia Fusion headlined an explosion of interest both in indie games and in canned game design software.[citation needed] Whereas earlier game creation systems tend to err on the side of user friendly interfaces,[7] 21st-century systems are often distinguished by extensive scripting languages that attempt to account for every possible user variable.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_creation_system
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Post » Fri Feb 17, 2017 11:50 am

lamar wrote:A little history of game design software:

Early game creation systems such as Broderbund's The Arcade Machine (1982), Pinball Construction Set (1983), ASCII's War Game Construction
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_creation_system

Clickteam created the event sheet - visual programming via an event sheet - they did it in the 90ies with Klik and Play.
Reusable objects that populate the event sheet
Last edited by blurymind on Fri Feb 17, 2017 12:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post » Fri Feb 17, 2017 12:02 pm

blurymind wrote:
lamar wrote:A little history of game design software:

Early game creation systems such as Broderbund's The Arcade Machine (1982), Pinball Construction Set (1983), ASCII's War Game Construction
...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_creation_system

Clickteam created the event sheet - visual programming via an event sheet.
Reusable objects that populate the event sheet



Well you are welcome to your opinion but before Clickteam was even around there were game engines packing coding into easily called routines that are events.

Trying to claim one is the grandfather is pretty ridiculous in my opinion. They are all extensions of BASIC and MS-DOS and other languages.

BUT then I am probably quite bit older than most of you and designed games using those languages and observed the progression of game design engines up close and personal.
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Post » Fri Feb 17, 2017 12:15 pm

lamar wrote:Well you are welcome to your opinion but before Clickteam was even around there were game engines packing coding into easily called routines that are events.
Trying to claim one is the grandfather is pretty ridiculous in my opinion. They are all extensions of BASIC and MS-DOS and other languages.

Basic and dos did not have an event sheet.
You seem to not be getting my point about visual programming at all - nobody claims that clickteam invented game engines or programming languages.

http://media.moddb.com/images/engines/1 ... 86_003.png
this is the event sheet in klik and play
- the left column is conditions, the right is actions
it also has the event editor
http://www.clickteam.com/creation_mater ... /sshot_(17).Png
You add them to cells by right clicking and selecting items - just like construct

this was created long before construct, but construct perfected it with the event sheet - by adding sub events and replacing the tick marks with event editor type cells. Scirra also added proper functions that take parameters in place of fusion 2.5's limited fastloops.

Clickteam has now made it so you can switch to event sheet mode in fusion 3 - similar to construct's. Also added sub events and functions that can take parameters
http://www.clickteam.com/wp-content/upl ... ntList.gif
http://www.clickteam.com/wp-content/upl ... Toggle.gif
http://www.clickteam.com/wp-content/upl ... 52x264.png
They have remade the entire fusion engine from scratch to modernize it

They have also added some tricks to code reusal that remind me of how godot handles scene inheritance
Last edited by blurymind on Fri Feb 17, 2017 12:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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