Krita or Inkscape?

Discussion of tools and resources for game developers

Post » Wed Dec 02, 2015 9:34 am

As for which software to pick, ultimately the best tool for the job is the one you have at your disposal and are comfortable using. My recommendation is try different software for a few hours and pick the ones you most like working with (that get the job done).

Just a tip if anyone needs Photoshop and doesn't have a license, Adobe has released Photoshop CS2 version for free (and also CS2 versions of other Creative Suite programs like Illustrator, Audition and After Effects). While quite old, it has all the essential features and is capable of achieving pretty much anything you need in making 2D game graphics.
http://www.redmondpie.com/download-adob ... still-can/
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Post » Wed Dec 02, 2015 8:16 pm

AdiJager is correct: it is best to combine Krita and InkScape in your asset generation workflow. Sometimes vectors work better, and at other times a bitmap-oriented approach (Krita) will work best. And there is nothing against combining the two, and relying on their respective strengths.

And Gimp is often used as well for certain tasks.

To learn more about InkScape and game art, why not check out the "game art for programmers" blog:
http://www.2dgameartguru.com/
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Post » Wed Dec 02, 2015 8:34 pm

In my opinion if you are after vector art in games I would go for Flash since animation is possible there with certain ease regarding the timeline (unfortunately not free, but there are monthly installments possible - although there is a trial available for testing purposes). For raster animation - Krita Def.
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Post » Wed Dec 02, 2015 9:31 pm

Solomon wrote:In my opinion if you are after vector art in games I would go for Flash since animation is possible there with certain ease regarding the timeline (unfortunately not free, but there are monthly installments possible - although there is a trial available for testing purposes). For raster animation - Krita Def.


Keeping vector graphics vector in games is generally much too slow - so those will have to be converted to bitmap elements anyway.

Flash is an okay animation tool for character animation: Anime Studio is far more evolved for that type of work (and inexpensive compared for the regular non-pro version). If the game engine supports cut-out animation tools, then either Spriter or Spine offer a superior pipeline and workflow.

Everything really depends on the game graphic style you decide on in the initial game design stage. Only then should you decide on the tool(s) you will use.
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Post » Wed Dec 02, 2015 11:37 pm

The program a person uses is based firstly on two major factors:

1) Budget available - free or commercial? How much is there to spend?
2) Deadline - if tight schedule stick to what you know, instead of learning new software.

Only then is the style considered. If the style is considered first, it may have to be changed after considering the answers to the two questions above.

As for the style, there are 3 main aspects to consider (focusing on 2D drawn here, and not 3D prerendered animation sequences or photographed stop motion, however a combination of the two can be used in cutout animation as well) is between frame by frame animation, cut-out animation (tweening) or a blend of both.
You can go for cutout animation in Flash as well frame by frame, or Photoshop and After Effects combined for example as both together work good for cutout.
Some folks even go for Flash and After Effects.
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Post » Thu Dec 03, 2015 4:07 pm

@Raytek

I would like to learn from you, how is Anime Studio more evolved than Flash regarding animation? What functions are in Anime Studio that are not available in Flash, which are so crucial to 2D animation?

I think not only I would be interested in you providing some arguments and feedback, the whole community could learn something.


P.S. From my experience a person that is skilled can even make use of a brick, so to speak.
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Post » Fri Dec 04, 2015 12:29 pm

I animated a circle today with Synfig.
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Post » Fri Dec 04, 2015 5:16 pm

Flash Professional is becoming Adobe Animate CC:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhgQ4ZDKYfs
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Post » Tue Dec 29, 2015 11:19 pm

both krita and inkscape are excellent for sprites. It depends on wether you want to work in vectors or bitmap
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Post » Wed Jan 06, 2016 1:57 am

I personally use Inkscape more, I also own ArtRage, but find way easier to do my sprites on Inkscape, but I guess it depends as well on the type of sprite you wanna do, in my case I'm doing some isometric sprites, so InkScape works perfectly
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