Programmer & Designer At The Same Time

Discuss game development design and post your game ideas

Post » Thu Oct 02, 2014 7:39 pm

When I go to college, can I learn game programming & Game design? because I really enjoy programming from HTML, CSS, PHP, Xojo (soon javascript), but I'm afraid I cant do them both. My main point to be clear , if I worked in a game dev company, can i be the designer & programmer of a project at the same time? Because I don't enjoy my programming without designing, and vice versa. :(
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Post » Thu Oct 02, 2014 9:52 pm

If you work in a company, then normally the work is divided between the team members, for example on does the programming, one the design, another the animations and more one guy for the sound effects. For big, ambitious projects this is much better, than one person making everything alone. But if you make your own little games at home, it is possible with a lot of hard work to do everything yourself. And with enough time and money you can study everything you want of course - only for become a real professional it's better to concentrate on one area alone. Also with just one area you have enough to learn for the rest of your life...
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Post » Mon Oct 06, 2014 4:24 pm

The short answer is no.

The opinionated answer is, you don't want to. It's better to excel at one thing in the workplace than to be a jack of all trades. Both for your sanity and the productivity of the company you end up working for. Specializing will make you more valuable.

You can ALWAYS do both, you just might not be able to do both at WORK. And you're free to double major :)
Developing Surolace, the survival role playing space game.

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Post » Mon Oct 06, 2014 7:40 pm

I think, have notions in both domains, but do not try to be the best at both domains, sure, some people can successfully take both tasks (sometimes more) at once, but it is a risky thing to do.

Designers can see and foresee rules, environnements, they can modify them and adapt them to have a pleasant result, but it is creation, there are rules, but not set in stone, this is more art than science.

Programming however is application, doing the core, implementing and make a machine interpret the result, while keeping in mind that organisation and restrictions are part of the deal, this is more science than art this time.

This is my personnal interpretation of both, there are of course more accurate definitions, but I think you should be open to both, while working in one side in particular, could be wrong though.

I know it is not a very useful awnser, but the question's awnser is "you can, but because you can, does that mean it is better?"
Game design is all about decomposing the core of your game so it becomes simple instructions.
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Post » Tue Oct 07, 2014 12:29 am

Yes you can, Jonathan blow made the design and cods for one of the best 2d game "Braid".
Also Fez made by one guy.
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Post » Sat Oct 11, 2014 4:45 pm

I was an art major in college. Here are my thoughts.

Art is harder to learn than programming because it requires practice. You can't get good just by reading a tutorial. You need hands on work to train yourself.

Depending on the type of art the game requires, there are many things you might need to learn such as human anatomy, perspective, composition, color theory, animation principles, light and value, landscapes, and so on.

Programming is more of a science than an art. You learn the rules, and then do it. You may need practice to help engrave something into memory, but that's it. Over time, you learn techniques and figure out better ways to do something. How well you can code depends on how much experience you have, though creativity can make problem solving easier.

Unlike programming, there are no rules for art. You can make the game look however you want. However, if you work for some company, you may need to be able to make your art blend in with the game. If the game is realistic, they won't want you doing cartoony bosses.

Working for yourself, you have complete freedom. You can do both programming and art. If you work for someone else, you will probably just do one thing, though it helps to have some experience with more than one skill. For example, in a video I watched by a concept artist from Naughty Dog, he mentioned that concept art these days can be done in 3d to make it better integrated into the pipeline and give the 3d artists a starting point. so, it helps to have enough skill to be able to be diverse.

Construct 2 is pretty easy to use. In one year, I can make about anything I can think of. I spend most of my time doing the hard parts like art. Creating animations and good level graphics are where most of my time is being spent. Keep in mind that I'm 32 and have been doing art since I was born practically. Don't expect shortcuts to good art.

Programming outside of Construct 2 will be harder to learn. I like C2 because it is visual oriented. Learning code seems like a chore to me, and I've even made my own websites in the past, so I know a bit about html and css. If you really want to learn it, it will take a while, so focus on one thing at a time rather than becoming an expert at every programming language at once.

I would pick an area of focus. Either concentrate on art or concentrate on programming. Then, learn the other skill as a secondary skill that you spend less time on. My choice would be art as a primary, but be honest with how well you could do at it before you decide. If you think of yourself more of a programmer, then concentrate on that instead. Then, divide it up, maybe 80/20. So, 80 percent of the time you are training, you are focusing on art, and the other 20 percent of your time is devoted to learning programming.
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Post » Sat Oct 11, 2014 9:03 pm

"Art is harder to learn than programming because it requires practice."

These words could start a war in most offices. I find it difficult to refrain from refuting you.
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Post » Sat Oct 11, 2014 9:42 pm

skelooth wrote:"Art is harder to learn than programming because it requires practice."

These words could start a war in most offices. I find it difficult to refrain from refuting you.


I guess it would start a war, lol.

But from the perspective of someone trying to learn enough programming to make a game vs getting good enough at art to create high end graphics, I'd say art is harder because it's less straight forward.

Of course, in the end, it depends on your goals and what you want to make to see which is harder.

And well, we'd have to take into consideration what people are naturally good at. Some people are good at art from the get go, others are good with math and whatnot.

I'm not going to argue or say anyone is wrong. This is just my opinion based on my personal experience. I've watched people struggle with art for years.
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Post » Sat Oct 11, 2014 9:59 pm

"But from the perspective of someone trying to learn enough programming to make a game"

Yeah... I don't even know what to say to that. It is clear you have very little experience with software development or why it's such a highly paid in demand career. If you think writing an engine from the ground up is somehow trivial, you are sorely mistaken.
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Post » Sat Oct 11, 2014 10:06 pm

skelooth wrote:"But from the perspective of someone trying to learn enough programming to make a game"

Yeah... I don't even know what to say to that. It is clear you have very little experience with software development or why it's such a highly paid in demand career. If you think writing an engine from the ground up is somehow trivial, you are sorely mistaken.


But we were not talking about programming advanced software or creating engines. Just learning enough to make games is not as involved, especially with the visual approach of most game engines.

If we are talking about really advanced stuff that requires full-time study, then yeah, fair enough.

If he is going to learn enough about programming to do that, I would wager he would not have time to do any art at all anyway.
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