Should I copyright before offering non-exclusive deals?

Ideas and discussion about publishing and distributing your games

Post » Fri Sep 09, 2016 7:11 am

nvbenegra wrote:
You register your ownership at somewhere like copyright dot gov < and then you go to any of the three mentioned above if you want to.


Probably differers from country to country. But from what I read copyright is an automatic right which you don't need to register. At least in Sweden.
https://www.prv.se/en/copyright/what-may-be-protected/
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Post » Fri Sep 09, 2016 9:18 am

nvbenegra wrote:Of course.

Video Games and the law: Copyright, Trademark and Intellectual Property by New Media Rights
http://newmediarights.org/guide/legal/Video_Games_law_Copyright_Trademark_Intellectual_Property


Thanks for sharing. It's an interesting read for anyone looking into copyright issues.
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Post » Fri Sep 09, 2016 9:36 am

nvbenegra wrote:And for the record I have my degree in music business. I just wonder if it works the same for video games.


Thanks for providing the link about "Video Games and the law"! I learnt a lot from reading it but always wondered about the following and since you also have a degree in music business, maybe you have the answer, so here goes:

When a game is made backwards compatible or re-released (e.g Xbox 360 games on Xbox One) for a new console, do the game producers have to pay the licence fees for music and perhaps guest character tie-ins again, or is it already covered the first time around when it was first released? I imagine there might be a clause in the contract that states, if the game were to be re-released, these will be the terms in place. Is it covered the first time around or will they have to be renegotiated?

I am trying to figure out if making a game backwards compatible is an extra financial cost or just pure benefits for the producer. Why does it take longer for some games to be made available as backwards compatible? Is it cause of licences? It's sad to see games like OutRun (Ferrari) and Mickey Mouse: Castle of Illusion disappearing due to expiring licencing issues.
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Post » Fri Sep 09, 2016 2:07 pm

I may have misinderstood your question but here's my answer:

When you say producer
Producer could be me with some money to pay for whatever product I need.

Like in a movie. Executive producer is the one that actually owns the money.

The producer is the one that got the money from the executive. The producer then is in charge of this money.

The producer's job is to find the right people for the job and make the money for the executive.

On the music part:

When you're a music composer and you meet the "music director" remember that the music director works for the producer who does the work to make the executive happy.


Contract:

If you offer the music directly to the "client" the "client" (this could mean the misic director or could be anynody) you either make the clause of use or you are offer a deal. It is up to you.

This could mean them buying the right of your music. Or just paying to use the music in specific ways for specific amount of time or use. Royalties may or may not be included.


I hope this helps you understand better.
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Post » Sat Sep 10, 2016 9:00 am

Ah, excellent. This was slightly different than what I meant but actually very educational. Will get back to you with more questions later.
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Post » Sat Sep 10, 2016 3:43 pm

The backward compatibility issue could be for lots of reasons. Licenses and contracts are part of it.

Backward compatibility means a new use of the material not stated in the first original contract. In this case Xbox 360.
For a backward compatibility access you create a new contract for new licenses that permit the use of the content in this new platform if this was not stated in the original contract.
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Post » Mon Sep 12, 2016 7:37 am

nvbenegra wrote:Backward compatibility means a new use of the material not stated in the first original contract. In this case Xbox 360.


Yeah, I was wondering about this. Would the developer and music creator/owner consider the backwards compatibility on the Xbox One as new use of the material, or would it be considered identical to before, just for the Xbox 360? The reason I ask is because, when you play a backwards compatible game, it looks as though the Xbox One is "emulating" the Xbox 360. To me, it looks as if you are logging onto Xbox 360 system, and people on your friend list "might" think that you are playing the game directly from the 360 rather than through the Xbox One. Because of this emulation, maybe the contracts and licences remain the same and do not have to be renewed or negotiated?

nvbenegra wrote:For a backward compatibility access you create a new contract for new licenses that permit the use of the content in this new platform if this was not stated in the original contract.


So if this is necessary, already high or higher than expected prices for new licences and permits may be considered too expensive for the developer? I imagine people complaining about games not being made backwards compatible, probably thinking it could be done by the press of a button. But then you have these possibly sky high licence costs that may not make it worth it. There is a chance and hope for that old games for the 360 may be bought by new users on the Xbox One, thus extending their online shelf life. However, perhaps most people already bought the game on the 360, meaning that the developer is then not gaining any money but rather have to spend extra on new licences and permits. For all I know, making a game backwards compatible may be done just cause its good customer service and not necessarily profitable, in fact the opposite.
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