The Art of Game Design vs. Tycoon games

Discuss game development design and post your game ideas

Post » Thu Jul 28, 2016 7:22 pm

First of all, the article/book you read seems to be targeted towards certain games, not all. Puzzle games for example don't align with those topics. Clash of Clans and World of Warcraft, two games that topped their category, didn't have definite endings. So it may be good advice but may only apply to certain games.

I wanted to comment on the 'surprises' topic. A lot of those games you mentioned do have some surprises in them, but they can't be surprises that throw the game too much either way as they are strategy games. For example Civilization has the little barbarian huts or native tribes where you can gain a technology or get ambushed. SimCity for SNES I remember had "gifts" where if you were doing well you would get a special building.

As for your recent discussion I agree that these 'sandbox' type games which you are referring to allow the player to create their own story in a way. You may not have character dialogue and that detailed focus but if the player gets attached to something in the game then there can be drama. For example, if you are playing SimCity and have something planned out in your head then a fire comes along and ruins it. It becomes the story of your city. Or in Civilization there could be plenty of twists: you plan to take over a civilization but while your forces are out you get surprise attacked by someone else. You don't need to lay out a narrative for the player because the player guides it—whether they want to be risky or safe, etc. etc. Some players really get into that but some don't.
ImageImageImage
B
44
S
26
G
11
Posts: 518
Reputation: 10,502

Post » Thu Jul 28, 2016 11:37 pm

Well I don't really think story is the main appeal of those game, since they mostly focus on resource management, creativity, as well as just how cool it is to make your own towns, but I'd have to say any story elements to them would be mostly subconscious. The joys watching your villagers go from job to home in banished, tells a bit about their daily lives. Watching them drop from starvation, is a great way of instilling the horror of knowing you are responsible for the virtual catastrophe. While a rebel group in tropico lets you know the islanders hate you, their dictator.

Also there are plenty of other examples of games with implied, or just no story to it whatsoever. The original nazi zombies mode in world at war, only really hinted at a vague story, and it was a huge success.
B
12
S
3
Posts: 30
Reputation: 842

Post » Fri Jul 29, 2016 12:18 am

I just noticed your other post and had a few ideas for mechanics that might add a bit of story to the game you want to make. Just pm me if you want to brain storm.
B
12
S
3
Posts: 30
Reputation: 842

Post » Fri Aug 12, 2016 8:11 am

I don't think this book is the be all and end all when it comes to game design, in my opinion what makes strategy games fun is the sense of accomplishment when you win a battle etc or where you are rewarded by being able to level up, not just in your stats (although that can definitely work) but in what units and such you have access to.
Image keep updated on my new game: Still Human
B
13
S
5
G
1
Posts: 155
Reputation: 1,608

Post » Fri Aug 12, 2016 10:24 pm

The essence of game design:
"Propaganda Games: Sesame Credit - The True Danger of Gamification"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHcTKWiZ8sI
https://www.ravenheart.ca/home
I don't check the forums much anymore, but I will receive an email for PMs.

"Someone once told me I bite off more than I can chew...

I told them I would rather choke on greatness than nibble on mediocrity."
B
23
S
6
G
1
Posts: 1,419
Reputation: 4,857

Previous

Return to Game Development, Design & Ideas

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest