The Do's & Do Not's of Game Design

Discuss game development design and post your game ideas

Post » Tue Oct 14, 2014 1:05 am

This is hilarious! The writer must have had quite a kick writing this. My favorite:

"DO let me have as many save slots as I want. Because you’re on PC! You’re free! The most a save is likely to take up is about 10MB. My hard drive is, like, lots more megabytes than that! Millions of them! There is no reason in the whole wide universe why you need to restrict me to eight. I might want to keep my earlier saves without having to hand copy them from which ever stupid folder you’ve secreted them into that you won’t tell me anyway. Is it because you hate gamers? You work so hard, for so many months, and by the time your game is done you just feel nothing but contempt for your potential customers? “How many saves shall we allow in the PC version? We’ve got room for infinity of them.” “THREE. And store them in the Recycle Bin.”"

I think this is why we must continue playing games even when we are developing: To remember the nuances of what annoys us that games sometimes do.
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Post » Tue Dec 16, 2014 11:41 pm

Interesting post, enjoyed reading it
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Post » Sat Dec 20, 2014 8:08 pm

Great post, and thanks for sharing!
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Post » Sat Feb 14, 2015 2:48 am

Do not read game design articles.
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Post » Wed Feb 18, 2015 3:30 am

xoros wrote:Do not read game design articles.


Why not? :)
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Post » Wed Feb 18, 2015 8:53 am

IMHO, the stuff in this articles does not translate to reality.

Is it possible to write a wonderful piece of music after reading a musical theory book or beats production tutorial? No - if a person does not have talent, but if you have a talent you'll be doing it just right without any books and articles.

The only rule of thumb is keep practicing. Carefully observing/studying features from other good games by playing them also helps a lot.
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Post » Wed Feb 18, 2015 11:38 am

Pehaps the points in this article don't translate to reality, but this article don't necessarily represent game design articles at large. But it does have a good amount of good points, it all depends on what game you make. This is not the be-all end-all of game design, it's one article, written by a journalist and not a designer.

Writing music and developing a game are two very different things, believe me I do both. One is about recognizing pitch and having a trained ear, muscle memory and dexterity. game design, not so much. Game design is a lot of theory: psychology, behaviorism, most importantly logic. All do translate well into articles and other written media.

Post-mortems are some of the most interesting articles I've ever read and there's tons of great information in them. Game design articles can contain great amounts of knowledge and tricks that you can learn of instead of running into the wall yourself and learning the hard way. There was a double fine "dev plays" episode featuring John Romero, it was amazingly interesting and I learned a great deal from it, you should def. take a look. I strongly disagree that you should not seek out prior knowledge, which is part of reading articles and consuming other kinds of similar media (video interviews with devs for example).

That said, no one expect to be able to perfectly master a skill just by reading about it. Articles are a good tool, a very good tool I might add and will most likely aid you as a developer more than hurt you. It's not a substitute for practice and no one suggested as such. I believe every developer should read as much as they can but be smart about what information is useful for their game. Information is never not useful, eventually. So absorb it all for future reference. :)
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Post » Wed Feb 18, 2015 2:10 pm

Well, yes, it will definitely not harm, but you will not start producing better games after reading game design articles. Only practicing as much as you can: participating in game jams, hackatons, sketching your ideas on paper, writing game design docs, finding a game dev job, drawing game characters etc. - that will make you a better game designer.

I'm also a musician - I can tell you music and games have a lot in common. Playing music is all about talent, translating your personality into the groove and melody and looots of practicing.

Again, IMHO.
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Post » Wed Feb 18, 2015 3:33 pm

I thoroughly disagree. As I've stated above, it will help but it's not a substitute for practice and skill. If an article talk about level design and what benefits certain tricks will have (for example: loop-backs, intuitive color schemes, flow etc.) then anyone who don't know those subtleties of level design will have to learn it the hard way instead of thinking "yeah that's right never thought of that" after reading an article on the subject.

It might not work for you personally, but I strongly disagree with the notion to discourage people from reading articles on the subject.
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Post » Wed Mar 04, 2015 10:50 am

Funny article. Although it strikes me more of an outlining of tropes sometimes. Tropes aren't always bad, sometimes they serve a good use.

Of course, definitely good tips for immersion!
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