The Do's & Do Not's of Game Design

Discuss game development design and post your game ideas

Post » Sun Mar 15, 2015 9:15 pm

xoros wrote:Is it possible to write a wonderful piece of music after reading a musical theory book or beats production tutorial? No - if a person does not have talent, but if you have a talent you'll be doing it just right without any books and articles.


As a guy who have played the guitar for 15 years, and fiddling around with various music production programs, I must say that I agree. I used to create better and more original music before I started learning the theory. Now I am all tied up in scales and so on, instead of creating music from the heart.

Though, I am not sure if the case is the same with game design. Game mechanics is something that has to be right, or else the game will feel clunky and unprofessional. Reading articles can prevent this from happening..
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Post » Mon Mar 16, 2015 9:28 am

The most important skill for game designer is attention to details and ability to observe and understand mechanics of other games, understanding why it works or not. Modern free to play game design is heavily based on human psychology e.g. behaviorism. I would rather suggest reading some psychological studies in that area if you're interested in free to play.

Another good technique to learn game design is trying to replicate interesting mechanics, visual feedback, rewarding systems, retention mechanics etc from other games 1:1 just for the sake of understanding, how it works under the hood.
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Post » Mon Apr 20, 2015 2:29 am

"DON’T splash on my screen. I AM NOT A SCREEN! I’M A HUMAN! When it rains, this does not leave droplets running down the front of my vision. This is because I have a face, including a nose, chin and forehead. Concealed between these features are my eyes – two orbs that sit within the protective bonage of my skull, accompanied by the cleaning and dust-deflecting skinflaps of my eyelids. Were raindrops, or worse, splatters of blood, to become visible droplets in my vision, they would have to be on my eyes. I would respond to this by running around, screaming in pain and fear, clutching at my face and begging for help. You appear to be under the impression that I am a sentient monitor. Perhaps a screen mounted on top of human shoulders. I’m not one of these. I’m reasonably sure the character in the game isn’t one of these. So just perhaps can we please stop having splashes appear in front of our view? (Oh, and I’m also not a bloody camera lens, so can we also get rid of lens flare too? Kthnx.)"

But Mario Kart 8 had it?
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Post » Mon May 11, 2015 7:22 am

Great post, thanks for sharing :D :mrgreen:
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Post » Wed May 20, 2015 12:09 am

A great article! Seems the game designer needs to be a very passionate person, I totally got it after watching the Indie Game movie
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Post » Tue May 26, 2015 8:56 pm

my game design is poor , i got good ideas but not very good with design , i need someone to work with me
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Post » Sat Jun 13, 2015 7:46 pm

This is a good post! But the article is a little arrogant.
A strong case can be made against all of those.
Breaking the 4th wall isn't just done "to be clever" or "seem original" it can be a great part of the experience. You don't have to follow the "reality principle" dogmatically.

Not having checkpoints can create a "save and learn and repeat" kind of monotony that kills any tension in a game and takes away any consequence of failure.

Like playing in God mode all the time. And really does a toilet in a game need to operate? Are you being "clever and original" by making it do so any time past say Duke Nukem 3d?
Follow my CZero development on twitter https://twitter.com/CaptainZeroGame
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Post » Wed Jul 01, 2015 11:41 am

Fun and interesting :)
Thanks for sharing, I might use some of these advices later, even if I disagree with many points ;)
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Post » Wed Nov 18, 2015 8:32 pm

Most of the points are really obvious, but I guess a reminder couldn't hurt, so thanks for sharing.
However, there are a lot of controversial opinions too in this article, so I think it must be taken with caution.
Hello !

I'm Steven, a 22 years old French graphic designer and programmer, and it's been two years since I started using Construct 2.

I'm working on a big real-time RPG project all by myself (kind of like the Tales of series).

I'm looking for a more stable professional situation, so if you could offer me a job please let me know !

I'm curious, I speak French fluently and I manage very well in English. Also, I would love to travel, so working abroad wouldn't be a problem.
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Post » Thu Nov 19, 2015 1:47 am

The text mentionned little about Game Design. In that sense I would rather point out to obvious books like Theory of Fun and also The Art of Game Design which are great books.
Also, I don't think you necessarily need to know all these rules to make really cool games. I doubt the young guy that created Titan's Souls par exemple knew all of this, yet he managed to created a pretty awesome game. I think there's a lot of creativity involved and also common sense.

I think creating a game should be a matter of doing it the way you think its right for you rather than how the industry tells you it should be.
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