The Mobile Gold Rush

Discuss game development design and post your game ideas

Post » Sat Jan 19, 2013 4:26 am

That's a good point, there isn't one specific strategy that will work for all games. I was letting too much of my own strategy color that comment about targeting PC first.

Part of what drove it though is the impression that I got from everything that I've read is that it is in fact harder to get noticed on mobile than it is on PC. However, I don't know that for sure because getting a game noticed is not an exact science, so I could be wrong. It just seems the PC has more of an indie culture that websites are more willing to report on.
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Post » Mon Apr 29, 2013 11:14 am

In my opinion, if it is a mass market platform (desktop, mobile, web)- it does not really matter where to publish. What does really matter is how you conceptualize and integrate your business model into the gameplay, which should be designed with your target group in mind.

You should consider this questions first:
- Core game play (e.g. if you wanna reach a mass market you should go for super-straight forward things, interactions should be clear, no frustrations, but the gameplay should be meaningful and with depth)
- Setting: gfx, story etc. There are some rules of thumbs like polished and straight gfx, progression indicators etc, no SciFi or fantasy.
- What is your "viral" strategy?
- What is your business model (how are you going to monetize)
- Metagames are the most important (user retention & engagament) There are some good examples of games in appstore, which are great because of very well designed metagames (e.g. Puzzle Craft)

There are many games in appstore and google play, but only may be 10-5% are vere well designed products. There are tons of nice and easy games, which are easy to pick, but the lack depth and you throw them away after playing them a couple of times. So I think there's always room for cool stuff, no matter how saturated the market is.   
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Post » Mon Apr 29, 2013 7:35 pm

[QUOTE=xoros] In my opinion, if it is a mass market platform (desktop, mobile, web)- it does not really matter where to publish. What does really matter is how you conceptualize and integrate your business model into the gameplay, which should be designed with your target group in mind.

You should consider this questions first:
- Core game play (e.g. if you wanna reach a mass market you should go for super-straight forward things, interactions should be clear, no frustrations, but the gameplay should be meaningful and with depth)
- Setting: gfx, story etc. There are some rules of thumbs like polished and straight gfx, progression indicators etc, no SciFi or fantasy.
- What is your "viral" strategy?
- What is your business model (how are you going to monetize)
- Metagames are the most important (user retention & engagament) There are some good examples of games in appstore, which are great because of very well designed metagames (e.g. Puzzle Craft)

There are many games in appstore and google play, but only may be 10-5% are vere well designed products. There are tons of nice and easy games, which are easy to pick, but the lack depth and you throw them away after playing them a couple of times. So I think there's always room for cool stuff, no matter how saturated the market is.   [/QUOTE]

Very well written and makes a lot of good points.

I don't agree with 'no fantasy or sci-fi'. We have Dragon Age and Mass Effect for the computer. On the App store for RPG's just past Minecraft stuff(which is not an RPG) there are a lot of fantasy games.

Otherwise I agree with your important points :)
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Post » Sun Oct 04, 2015 5:21 am

Catching up with Construct2 posts--
I think about the old Stanford story on how he had made money during the gold rush. He made his money selling the equipment to the miners. Yes, some miners became rich, but Stanford made more millions than many of his miners. The same phenomena happened in web-comics with the Half-pixel crew and Penny Arcade. Interestingly it was the boom of decent graphics on computer screens with faster internet that prompted that ten year boom. However, the cross over between comics and video games help pave the way for PAX to act like a Stanford, creating a platform for indies to compete with larger developers on multiple devices.

Looking at Timberman a huge success on the Android Market than a it's success on Steam, there is a visible cross market fro PC and Mobile.
http://www.businessinsider.com/the-insi ... iew-2014-7

However, considering Indie Game the Movie, focusing on the quality of the product matters the most as you want people just to play your games. This could lead to a publisher wanting to publish a game or work with you. Thus, another similarity to web-comics; this idea of gaining many likes or follower via the art you make. This kind of leads to the question of how much or what kind of marketing one has to do for mobile games?

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... 4K_QEzR4dv

I contend, the indie games have become the next webcomics and people of all ages will continue to make games even if we have smart watches with projector screens instead of real screens. I believe this because of how the web comics creators and market has evolved.

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Post » Fri Oct 16, 2015 6:21 pm

BurningWood wrote:Catching up with Construct2 posts--
I think about the old Stanford story on how he had made money during the gold rush. He made his money selling the equipment to the miners. Yes, some miners became rich, but Stanford made more millions than many of his miners.


Yup, this happens with the "Game Dev Software" companies. As can be expected, Scirra has more than likely made at least 2-3 times more profit with selling the licence than the most successful game dev using it. (By this I'm taking into account of costs to run the business, taxes, ect..) We all know Game Maker has. Of course now we have several major HTML5 dev software to choose from, with all kinds of start ups trying to be the next big tool.
And it always will work that way, unless the market shifts to price of finished product costing more than the tools. ex: people ok with buying a "cheap" game for $250, while the company only paid $25 for the dev software on unlimited computers in house.
Carpenters don't turn into millionaires just by building or repairing houses. But the company who sold them the hammers did.
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Post » Sun Oct 18, 2015 12:43 am

I have to give credit to the game for having a market watch as part of game play. I think it would be better to have a game teach people on how to be an indie team. After watching this video--

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8TTKgfcmps
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Post » Tue Oct 20, 2015 1:36 am

Message: cademan is not yet permitted to post plain text URLS (300 rep required). 1 URLS removed. Why?
BurningWood wrote:I have to give credit to the game for having a market watch as part of game play. I think it would be better to have a game teach people on how to be an indie team. After watching this video--


I liked that video but it seemed focused on just platformers. I wonder about other genre's for mobile. Especially puzzle games with in-app purchases.
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Post » Sat Oct 24, 2015 9:31 am

@cademan I do too, not sure where to get market watch data or if Steam publicly releases "wishlist" data as that helps publishers decided when to discount a game. There are top selling game lists on the App store, and it's easy to genre specify and make sub lists.

There is a old movie rule of thumb-- if a certain movie is released too much, then you stop releasing those kinds of movies, but if a trend is about to happen you make that kind of movie.

Meaning, if there are a lot of new puzzle games like "Bejeweled" or "Candy-crush" then making another one probably won't be a good idea. However, after a certain period of time making the next "Candy-crush", people will enjoy it as it has nostalgia value and brings something new to the gameplay.

Notably, this is a rule of thumb and doesn't account for new things like "Minecraft" and the failure to bring back Westerns as a film gerne. However, there was a game simulator I played that consider creating different game types based on market watches and trends in order to have a better chance at selling a game.
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Post » Sun Oct 25, 2015 7:55 am

Well, right now the apps market is great and will probably keep going on for quite a long time.

I believe it all depends on your product, if you release something that is amazing then it is possible that you will hit the jackpot, no matter in what platform you released it. For mobile devices you got to know how to monetize it as for mobiles you cannot really sell for a high price, however if you got millions of micro transactions you got it! it all comes down to the quality of the product in my opinion it got to have an x factor, whatever it is.

As when it comes to the traditional desktop market, I don't believe that the market will dry up at all. unless you get to a point where all you need is a tablet or mobile device to do everything efficiently.
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