What math and physics is needed?

Discuss game development design and post your game ideas

Post » Thu Sep 04, 2014 2:42 am

Hello, first of all, thank you very much for reading my post ...

During the last months, I realized that I have a big flaw in areas of mathematics, especially trigonometry, which is very necessary for any type of game. Realizing this problem, I would ask which knowledge of mathematics and physics are fundamental, based on their experienciascreando games.

And if anyone knows any online course that is dedicated to mathematics applied to 2D games. I will be very grateful

I was thinking of studying in places like khanacademy, etc.

Any recommendation?

thank you very much. Cheers!
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Post » Thu Sep 04, 2014 3:13 am

Trig, geometry, all are nice, but a great deal is simplified in C2.
If you have very little math, start with algebra, that will lead into computer math.
They have a few computer related lessons there as well.
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Post » Sun Sep 07, 2014 12:45 pm

Basically the only thing you have to be good at is algorithmics. And it's logic.
If you want to design games engines and stuff you will have to study computer science engineering. (basically an engineer) and that's tough.
You don't have to be good at maths at all to build a good game.

It's like telling that you have to be good at maths to write good music. No, you just have to be able to count til 4.


With a game engine you don't have to worry about almost nothing. Just making art stuff and train your scripting/algorithimic abilities.
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Post » Sun Sep 07, 2014 4:24 pm

C2 does a lot but I've learnt that it can do more the better your skills are.. better algorithms, better programming skills, and better maths and physics.

so you don't need it, but the more skills you bring to the game, the more you can push the boundaries.
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Post » Mon Sep 08, 2014 6:24 am

If you're not doing any physics simulation or artificial intelligence, algebra, vector, basic geometry and trigonometry should be enough for most 2d games. You can learn more at here.
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Post » Mon Sep 08, 2014 10:52 am

It is more a matter of what you want to accomplish, maths are just a tool, and I know quite a few people have trouble with what some consider as "the basics", C2 offers some system expressions to help when you do not know the exact formula to use, but it all revolves around trying to achieve a goal.

Try to see what you want to achieve, and see if you have tools that helps in C2, then if you have the knowledge to do it.

However I recommand knowing some basics about trigonometry (what sinus and cosinus are doing), some algebra (so you can manipulate formulas you could find). And for physics, you could try to see about something related to movement but I dont think it is required
Game design is all about decomposing the core of your game so it becomes simple instructions.
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Post » Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:41 pm

This is quite well explained if you need to get a good start:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... B7WQoHf-My
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Post » Tue Sep 09, 2014 6:49 pm

Tx you all for taking the time to answer.

and a special tx to @FraktalZero, awesome resource!

FraktalZero wrote:This is quite well explained if you need to get a good start:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... B7WQoHf-My
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Post » Wed Sep 10, 2014 1:16 am

You are very welcome! Hope that helps you :)
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Post » Wed Sep 10, 2014 10:18 pm

The more math/physics you know, the better your games will perform and the more you'll be able to build real world concepts believably into things like object behavior and animation. You'll have difficulty coming up with interesting and original dynamics and mechanics in a game if you don't have a lot of math to put those into practice with. Learning as much appropriate math/physics as you can will help you make literally everything better. Be warned though that the way the math/physics is used is in most cases isn't something that's really learned from math courses/textbooks. The internet will be a better teacher to you because it'll stick to relevant applications and you wont get lost in overly academic methods / analysis.
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