What to do after mastering Construct ?

Discussion and feedback on Construct 2

Post » Mon Sep 05, 2016 7:10 pm

Ashley wrote:I wouldn't say a degree is required - I don't have one (in software/computers) :P It may well help you get a job if you have a degree, but I don't think people should say it's required, since that could put some people off even trying. The most relevant thing to have is experience in the field you want a job in.


I think the same... I get 2 job without any degree (web development/web designer, graphic designer) but I have a great portfolio that 2 different company choose me and not others (some people with degree)

I think, the best way to learn is to understand the syntax of the language and get some example... start from the easy one, and go for it... so, read a book o follow some tutorial to undestand the logic of a language and start with different example

when I was 14/16 I learned to make website in flash like this... I was downloading example (like 1000) and use example in my project, you can do it here in construct2 and in all engine... the most important thing is to understand how you can solve problem with your logic...and how you can use the example that you download for your project.

When I start to use Construct2 for example, I learned advance script in php... I read very very small part of the construct2 manual and I made advance game (never published :cry: )

Construct2 is not for BIG game but you can make donkey kong country (that i did) and some advance game... and when you have the logic to make a game, you can change engine and use the same logic (or almost) to make in different language
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Post » Mon Sep 05, 2016 11:52 pm

Writing a big project in C2 will teach you how to debug stuff--which is a language independent skill any computer programmer needs. Its hard to figure out if someone can debug in an interview, but when you get programmers who can, you don't care what language they happen to know, you just hire them.

C2 programming will teach you how to debug (as will working in any computer language). The longer you keep working at programming the better you will get. Good firms don't care about the language and its details.
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Post » Tue Sep 06, 2016 12:52 am

I have worked for the industry since 1997.

Not entirely for 19 years, because I had other jobs along the way, but I was very fortunate to work for a number of good game companies such as Electronic Arts, Ubisoft, etc..

I worked mostly as Quality Assurance and there were quite a number of people I've met along the way who didn't have a degree nor diploma.

I only have a college diploma myself, by the way.

We were always using in-house game engines, so it doesn't really matter.. in terms of deciding what game engines you need to learn.

What matters the most is how you're going to show the Human Resources people what you're capable of.

The Human Resources department of the game companies, believe it or not, are filled with people who don't know anything about games.

If you want to work for a game company, then they're the ones you need to impress.

I've used many game engines, but Construct 2 is the best game engine I've used.

Use Construct 2 to create at least 5 complete mobile games yourself, before submitting a resume to game companies.

If you're looking to work as a programmer, then you need to be fluent with at least one programming language.

My recommendation is C++.

If you're looking to work on other roles, then you don't need to be fluent on any programming languages.

They'll value a person who has extra skills other people don't usually have.

Remember, what they're interested are only the end products.

The ones that show you're the one who can make them a lot of money even after taking multiple people's roles at once.

I don't work for the industry anymore, because it's fun to play high end console games, but not to live with them. :mrgreen:
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Post » Tue Sep 06, 2016 12:34 pm

I used to work at DICE (EA), and other gaming companies with no degree. I never heard anyone required a degree. Some of our best coders were self taught and so were many of the artists.

Artist = Portfolio is king. If you make awesome art, no degree is required.
Level Designer = Portfolio is king or a pupular game mod, or maybe your own game (Maybe a C2 made one) to show your skill.
Developer/coder = No degree is required if you know what you're doing and are a complete nerd.

Even if a company doesn't use C2, completing a full good game with it, will show you have the knowhow about the fundamentals of the game design process, so it's always good.

It all depends on what position you're aiming to get. You wanna make game engines? Then u better learn some proper coding language. Games industry has tons and tons of positions, some doesn't even require any particular skill at all. My team leader at EA used to be a carpenter before he decided to work in gaming. But as a team manager, just project managing the development. Many companies also use their own in-house tools and editors, so you have to learn new anyway.

So all in all, depends what you wanna do, or rather how hard you are willing to work to get there.

A degree can help in the more technical positions but besides from that, not really required.
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Post » Tue Sep 06, 2016 12:53 pm

You need experience & atleast a college degree in engineering or computer science, depending on your employer

Ashley, you are self-employed, I'd assume you would hire yourself if you had to hire somebody and you were available
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Post » Tue Sep 06, 2016 1:23 pm

I don't see degree mentioned anywhere in this Job ad from King, as a C++ developer, for example.

https://www.linkedin.com/jobs/view/1863 ... ev2_jymbii

For some countries/companies maybe degree is required, but skill/talent/experience usually weighs more than any degree. If you can show what you're capable of.
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Post » Tue Sep 06, 2016 3:08 pm

A degree is definitely not required to work in this industry, more so if the degree is outdated and somewhat irrelevant. And remember, you don't have to be an employee! You can run your own company if you want, but it needs a great investment of your part, and it's way riskier (being an employee it's easy way).
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Post » Thu Sep 08, 2016 12:09 pm

tunepunk wrote:I used to work at DICE (EA), and other gaming companies with no degree. I never heard anyone required a degree. Some of our best coders were self taught and so were many of the artists.

Artist = Portfolio is king. If you make awesome art, no degree is required.
Level Designer = Portfolio is king or a pupular game mod, or maybe your own game (Maybe a C2 made one) to show your skill.
Developer/coder = No degree is required if you know what you're doing and are a complete nerd.

Even if a company doesn't use C2, completing a full good game with it, will show you have the knowhow about the fundamentals of the game design process, so it's always good.

It all depends on what position you're aiming to get. You wanna make game engines? Then u better learn some proper coding language. Games industry has tons and tons of positions, some doesn't even require any particular skill at all. My team leader at EA used to be a carpenter before he decided to work in gaming. But as a team manager, just project managing the development. Many companies also use their own in-house tools and editors, so you have to learn new anyway.

So all in all, depends what you wanna do, or rather how hard you are willing to work to get there.

A degree can help in the more technical positions but besides from that, not really required.



I'm also EA alumni :D I was pretty much going to respond with what you said. OP didn't state what role they were looking for, a degree helps you to understand the various roles in game development but is not 100% necessary for games jobs if you have some experience and a portfolio. If you were to become a game designer I think a portfolio of games made in C2 would suffice. If you were to become a games programmer then a game made in C2 wouldn't be enough experience as you don't really know a programming language, so you'd have to do a degree or take some online courses. I worked as a dev for a short while at Lionhead and this was from just learning Kismet and UScript within Unreal Engine 3 in my spare time, creating some demo levels and learning how to fix bugs with the scripting language.
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Post » Thu Sep 08, 2016 5:23 pm

I know people in the game and comic industry that don't have degrees. They got their jobs due to the strength of their art. I think a portfolio is incredibly important for artist. A lot of job postings due require experience though. Sometimes multiple years of experience.

Writing a big project in C2 will teach you how to debug stuff--which is a language independent skill any computer programmer needs. Its hard to figure out if someone can debug in an interview, but when you get programmers who can, you don't care what language they happen to know, you just hire them.

C2 programming will teach you how to debug (as will working in any computer language). The longer you keep working at programming the better you will get. Good firms don't care about the language and its details.


I wonder if it's possible to learn something like java script and making something in Unity after becoming more fluent in logic and math after mastering C2? I know I've read others say you can. I'm an artist, 2d and 3d. No programming skill at all but a lot of companies prefer you having programming knowledge. I guess it all a depends on the person.

I think after mastering Construct, I'm going to make an MMO :ugeek:
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Post » Thu Sep 08, 2016 8:22 pm

heyguy wrote:I wonder if it's possible to learn something like java script and making something in Unity after becoming more fluent in logic and math after mastering C2? I know I've read others say you can. I'm an artist, 2d and 3d. No programming skill at all but a lot of companies prefer you having programming knowledge. I guess it all a depends on the person.


I am primarily an artist, but I'm learning programming. I'm currently learning c# and working in Unity. It is going well. It takes a lot of study, but I consider it to be worth it so far. I left C2 because I wanted to work in 3d.

I think C2 did help me learn the logic of programming, but of course it still looked like a foreign language when I first started looking at scripts. Now, I consider myself capable, though still beginner/intermediate skill level. But hey, I've only been learning programming for a few months. I can do what I need to do as long as I keep the game scope realistic.
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